MIMIT Health "Living Your Best Life" Series - The Best Diabetes Blogs of 2019

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MIMIT Health provides world-class health care combined with minimally invasive treatments by industry-leading physicians and surgeons. Along with our best-in-class health care, we focus on our patients "living their best life" with healthy lifestyle strategies and wellness solutions.

Managing diabetes can be challenging. But connecting with people who are navigating the same condition can make all the difference.

In selecting this year’s best diabetes blogs, Healthline looked for ones that stood out for their informative, inspiring, and empowering content. We hope you find them helpful.

Read Complete List

If you have any questions or would like to set up an appointment, MIMIT Health can be reached 24 hours a day, 7 days a week, at (708) 486-2600 or email info@mimithealth.com.

Vitallina Preventive & Integrative Care partnered with MIMIT Health To Host FREE Weekend Varicose Vein Seminar

Dr. Rusalina Mincu of Vitallina Preventive & Integrative Care with Dr. Sameer Ahmed of MIMIT Health

Dr. Rusalina Mincu of Vitallina Preventive & Integrative Care with Dr. Sameer Ahmed of MIMIT Health

Vitallina Preventive & Integrative Care held a free educational varicose vein seminar over the weekend to talk about varicose veins and what you can do to make your legs look and feel better. The goal of these seminars are to educate people with vein issues and arm them with the knowledge to make good, informed decisions about their leg health.

If you missed the event, feel free contact Dr. Rusalina Mincu with questions or to set up an appointment at Vitallina Preventive & Integrative Care at 773-654-1082

Getting rid of varicose veins isn’t about vanity. It’s about your health and quality of life. Varicose veins are the result of venous insufficiency: blood that pools in the vein because of a faulty valve. They are a symptom of early stage venous disease, and, untreated, can lead to increased symptoms and worsening appearance.

Modern varicose vein treatments are outpatient procedures that are minimally invasive. But there are also things you can do on your own to alleviate discomfort and help prevent the progression of symptoms.

If you’ve already developed varicose veins, there are a number of ways to deal with them. MIMIT Health offers Minimally Invasive Treatments for Varicose Veins. If you have any questions or would like to set up an appointment, MIMIT Health can be reached 24 hours a day, 7 days a week, at (708) 486-2600 or email info@mimithealth.com.

Dr. Paramjit “Romi” Chopra talks with NBC News and Today.com About Varicose Veins

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Varicose Veins:
Remedies and Treatment

Those bulging veins could lead to serious health issues.

April 8, 2019, 2:19 PM EDT / Source: TODAY

By Linda Carroll

If you’ve been covering up your legs because of unsightly knots of bluish veins, have hope: A simple procedure could help, according to an expert in treating varicose veins.

Of course, treating bulging veins isn’t just about vanity.

“People get upset when they see those veins,” said Dr. Paramjit “Romi” Chopra, founder and chairman of the Midwest Institute of Minimally Invasive Therapies, located near Chicago. But the unattractive appearance isn’t the worst problem with varicose veins, Chopra noted.

WHAT IS A VARICOSE VEIN?

The bulging veins can lead to blood clots that could eventually end up in in the lungs, a very dangerous condition, Chopra explained. They can also result in pain, swelling, leg fatigue and discoloration that eventually might turn into painful ulcers caused by blood leaking from the veins, he said.

WHAT CAUSES VARICOSE VEINS?

The cause of varicose veins, whether they are the large ropey variety or the thinner "spider" veins, is the same: malfunctioning valves. Think of the valves inside the veins as the locks in a canal. If a lock were to fail the water would flow backward leaving ships and barges stranded and the previous section of the canal flooded. A similar issue occurs when valves in the veins fail.

Veins are meant to bring blood back to the heart, Chopra explained. Your calves, as you walk or run, help push the blood in the veins up the leg past each valve. If the valve holds, then the blood moves up to the next vein segment with your next stride. But if the valve is faulty, the blood flows backwards building up pressure in the vein, eventually stretching out the blood vessel and sometimes allowing blood to leak into surrounding tissues. The hemoglobin in the leaking blood breaks down to a substance called hemosiderin.

“That acts like a tattoo discoloring the skin from the inside,” Chopra explained. Over time, painful skin ulcers can develop where the hemosiderin has accumulated.

WHY DO PEOPLE GET VARICOSE VEINS?

Not everyone develops varicose veins, Chopra said, adding that there are a number of risk factors:

  • Family history

  • Older age

  • Female gender

  • Obesity

  • Pregnancy

  • Occupation that requires a lot of standing

  • Smoking

  • Hypertension

  • Injury

While having a family history predisposes you to developing varicose veins, it doesn’t mean you’re destined to get them. Certain lifestyle changes may lower your risk, such as avoiding too much standing and developing an exercise program that allows your calves to do their work pumping blood up the legs, Chopra said. “You’ll never see a ballerina with varicose veins,” he added.

REMEDIES FOR VARICOSE VEINS:

If you’ve already developed varicose veins, there are a number of ways to deal with them. Your choice, at least in part, may depend on which one your insurance company is willing to pay for, Chopra noted.

MIMIT Health offers Minimally Invasive Treatments for Varicose Veins. If you have any questions or would like to set up an appointment, MIMIT Health can be reached 24 hours a day, 7 days a week, at (708) 486-2600 or email info@mimithealth.com.




Dr. Romi Chopra Speaks at The Outpatient Endovascular and Interventional Society's Sixth Annual National Scientific Meeting

Dr. Chopra’s presentation was on the Procedural, Economic & Patient Benefits of Radial Access

Dr. Chopra’s presentation was on the Procedural, Economic & Patient Benefits of Radial Access

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Dr. Romi Chopra presented on the Procedural, Economic & Patient Benefits of Radial Access at The OEIS 6th Annual National Scientific Meeting at the Vinoy Renaissance Resort & Golf Club, in St. Petersburg, Florida. The annual meeting features enlightening education sessions presented by some of the most knowledgeable speakers in their fields. The goal of OEIS is to serve and evolve the outpatient endovascular community through advocacy, education, promotion, development, and support.

The educational topics and themes are planned to address office-based interventional procedures and related research with a focus on innovations, evidence-based outcomes, assessment and interventions, continuous and legislative issues, practice management, patient safety, and environmental challenges.

OEIS is a patient centric society focused on ensuring quality healthcare for patients in all settings including the outpatient hospital and office based interventional suites. OEIS’s mission is to serve the public and the medical profession by improving the quality of healthcare through setting and adhering to these professional quality standards.

MIMIT Health is one of the fastest-growing independent multi-specialty physician groups in Illinois providing excellence in patient care, health care, research & medical education. 

MIMIT Health provides world class health care combined with minimally invasive treatments by industry-leading doctors, physicians and surgeons. Along with our best-in-class health care, we focus on our patients "living their best life" with healthy lifestyle strategies and wellness solutions.

If you have any questions or would like to set up an appointment, MIMIT Health can be reached 24 hours a day, 7 days a week, at (708) 486-2600 or email info@mimithealth.com.

April is Limb Loss Awareness Month - Amputation Doesn’t Have To Be The Only Outcome - MIMIT Health

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April is Limb Loss Awareness Month, a time to draw attention to the many people affected by limb loss and the reasons why amputations are performed.

People of all ages and from all walks of life lose limbs for a variety of reasons, and the number is growing. There are millions of people in the United States with amputations and The Amputee Coalition says that 60% of amputations are preventable.

Limb Loss Awareness Month helps bring attention to the growing number of those living with limb loss and to increase the understanding of amputation prevention. Approximately 2 million Americans currently live with limb loss and another 28 million are at risk for amputation. Limb loss is not uncommon and many may not be aware that it is largely due to disease (54%), and is preventable! Limb loss can affect people of all ages, ethnicities, and genders, but those at greatest risk are people who have diabetes or peripheral arterial disease (PAD).

Learn about peripheral artery disease
You may have friends or loved ones who mention that they have “poor circulation” and leg pain. Maybe they have wounds that won’t heal or they can’t sleep at night. But, they dismiss their health problems as just part of getting older. Or maybe you’re experiencing similar health problems yourself. The trouble is, health problems such as heavy, tired or painful legs and feet could point to something much worse than just getting older. You could be at risk for peripheral artery disease. Few people who have PAD know their options or even realize what PAD is. However, PAD is the biggest disease that most people have never heard about. It affects more than 18 million people – more than cancer, stroke and congestive heart failure**.  PAD isn’t something you can just shrug off. Early detection is important. If you think you might be at risk for the disease, consult a health care professional right away.

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Limb Loss Related to Vascular Disease
Peripheral arterial disease, also known as PAD, occurs when arteries become blocked and hardened by a buildup of plaque on the interior vessel walls decreasing blood flow to the legs and feet. As a result, the extremities do not receive the necessary amounts of oxygen and nutrients. If left untreated, PAD can lead to non-healing foot ulcers, wounds, and critical limb ischemia, all of which can lead to foot amputation.

Symptoms of PAD
Many people living with PAD do not experience any symptoms and are not aware that the disease is progressing. Those that do usually experience muscle cramping, leg pain or cold feet when walking that improves with rest. It’s possible that some people dismiss the symptoms as a normal part of the aging process.

The most common symptom of peripheral artery disease (PAD) in the lower extremities is a painful muscle cramping in the hips, thighs or calves when walking, climbing stairs or exercising.

The pain of PAD often goes away when you stop exercising, although this may take a few minutes. Working muscles need more blood flow. Resting muscles can get by with less.

If there's a blood-flow blockage due to plaque buildup, the muscles won't get enough blood during exercise to meet the needs. The "crampy" pain (called "intermittent claudication"), when caused by PAD, is the muscles' way of warning the body that it isn't receiving enough blood during exercise to meet the increased demand.

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Other symptoms of PAD include:

  • Leg pain that does not go away when you stop exercising

  • Foot or toe wounds that won't heal or heal very slowly

  • Gangrene, or dead tissue

  • A marked decrease in the temperature of your lower leg or foot particularly compared to the other leg or to the rest of your body

  • Poor nail growth on the toes or hair growth on the legs

  • Erectile dysfunction, especially in men with diabetes

The major risk factors for PAD are:

  • Smoking

  • Diabetes

  • Age

  • Kidney disease

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Be sure to find out if you are at risk for PAD and speak to a physician. Only a healthcare professional can diagnose PAD. When detected early, risk of amputation as a treatment option is lessened. Early detection can result in more PAD treatment options available, and may slow the progression of the disease. Initial treatment options for PAD could include lifestyle changes, prescription medications, or minimally invasive procedures to restore adequate blood flow to the limbs.

MIMIT Health offers Minimally Invasive Treatments for Peripheral Arterial Disease (PAD). If you have any questions or would like to set up an appointment, MIMIT Health can be reached 24 hours a day, 7 days a week, at (708) 486-2600 or email info@mimithealth.com.

Education is merely the first step towards taking action, not the last. If you or a loved one is at risk of amputation due to vascular disease such as PAD, help spread awareness and take preventive measures by getting screened or seeking treatment for symptoms.



** facts from https://standagainstamputation.com/peripheral-artery-disease/

Let’s Talk About Healthy Legs With Vitallina Preventive & Integrative Care & MIMIT Health

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Are you concerned about the way your varicose veins look? Or, more importantly, how they feel?

Getting rid of varicose veins isn’t about vanity. It’s about your health and quality of life. Varicose veins are the result of venous insufficiency: blood that pools in the vein because of a faulty valve. They are a symptom of early stage venous disease, and, untreated, can lead to increased symptoms and worsening appearance.

Modern varicose vein treatments are outpatient procedures that are minimally invasive. But there are also things you can do on your own to alleviate discomfort and help prevent the progression of symptoms.

At MIMIT Health, we believe that people with vein issues should have the knowledge to make good, informed decisions about their leg health. Come join us 2:00 pm on Saturday, April 13, to learn about varicose veins and what you can do to make your legs look and feel better.

This varicose vein seminar is free, but space is limited. Call 773-654-1082 to reserve your seat.


MIMIT Health offers Minimally Invasive Treatments for Varicose Veins. If you have any questions or would like to set up an appointment, Dr. Chopra and his associates can be reached 24 hours a day, 7 days a week, at (708) 486-2600 or email info@mimithealth.com.

Seasonal Allergies Are The Worst. Here's What You Need To Know For An Easier Spring

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This time of year in the western hemisphere is magical. You can feel nature coming alive, waking up from its long winter slumber. But as spring blossoms around us—as beautiful as it is—many of us also have seasonal allergies to worry about this time of year.

The FDA estimates that there are approximately 36 million people in the United States who suffer from seasonal allergies. Seasonal allergies are also sometimes called hay fever, or, by their technical (and very fancy) name, allergic rhinitis. It's important to know that allergic rhinitis technically takes two different forms:

Seasonal: This type of allergy is triggered by mold spores or pollens from grass, trees, and weeds, which happen more during changes of season.

Perennial: This type of allergy happens year round. It's generally caused by pet hair or dander, mold, dust mites, or cockroaches (gross, right?).

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Seasonal allergy symptoms.

Seasonal allergies can present in the form of a bunch of different symptoms—and many of them overlap with the common cold. Some common signs and symptoms to look out for include:

  • Sneezing

  • Runny nose

  • Stuffy nose due to blockage or congestion

  • Fatigue

  • Itchy eyes, mouth, nose, or throat

The root cause of seasonal allergies.

In order to really work toward overcoming seasonal allergies, we need to dive deeper into how the immune system works. Close to 80 percent of your immune system is located in your gut microbiome, and therefore, when your microbiome is weakened, so is your immune system. Many things can alter your gut health, including a poor diet, stress, and increased toxin exposure. This results in increased gut permeability—also known as leaky gut—inflammation, and an imbalance between good and bad bacteria.

Once again, it all comes back to gut health. In fact, in my clinic I have seen many patients' seasonal allergies start to alleviate as soon as they start healing their gut. The take-home here? Bad or worsening seasonal allergies might be why a patient comes to see me in the first place, but they rarely end up being the main issue once I start looking under the surface.

So now that we understand the root cause of seasonal allergies, we can narrow down tools to support both our gut and our immune system. In functional medicine, prevention is our main goal. We want to be proactive rather than reactive. So while certain over-the-counter allergy medications, prescription medications, and allergy shots can be helpful in some cases, we also want to focus on ways to fight allergies at the source—and hopefully eliminate the need to medicate (or stay indoors!) at all. These are my top remedies for both preventing and combating seasonal allergies so you can enjoy this season rather than dread it. There's no reason to stay indoors!

Read Entire Article: https://www.mindbodygreen.com/articles/seasonal-allergies-symptoms-causes-and-treatments


Dr. Paramjit "Romi" Chopra to speak at The Advanced Revascularization-Chapter XII (ARCH) Symposium

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The Advanced Revascularization-Chapter XII (ARCH) Symposium held in St. Louis is the nation’s premier interventional cardiology course specifically designed for the busy practicing physician and trainees. ARCH 2019 will focus on evidence based data, newer technological advances, case-based discussions, tips and tricks in complex cases, innovative therapeutic strategies that will enable physicians to treat their patients with high-risk and complex coronary, peripheral vascular and structural anatomy.

Attendees will learn from experts on the use of novel techniques and interventional tools, new CTO techniques, hemodynamic support during high-risk Coronary, Peripheral and Structural Interventions and decompensated heart failure, structural heart disease interventions and novel intravascular coronary anatomy/physiology techniques. In addition, use of newer adjunctive imaging modalities to optimize Coronary, Peripheral and Structural Interventions outcomes will be presented.

Participants will observe live cases and hear from International experts who will present their data and share their expertise. With a strong emphasis on participant-faculty interactions, attendees will learn the latest advances in interventional cardiology.

If you would like to attend this event, please register here

Lakers Star Brandon Ingram Out For Season After Discovery Of Deep Vein Thrombosis

(Photo by Steve Dykes/Getty Images)

(Photo by Steve Dykes/Getty Images)

Budding star Brandon Ingram, one of the lone bright spots for the Los Angeles Lakers this year, is reportedly done for the season. The Lakers say that doctors discovered a deep venous thrombosis in his shoulder.

Ingram has missed the last two games with a shoulder injury. According to the team, when doctors did further testing on the injury, they discovered the issue.

A deep vein thrombosis is a scary condition. It essentially means you have a blood clot in one of your body’s deep veins. The main risk is that it could travel to your lungs. read more

MIMIT Health offers Minimally Invasive Treatments for varicose veins and Deep Vein Thrombosis (DVT). If you have any questions or would like to set up an appointment, Dr. Chopra and his associates can be reached 24 hours a day, 7 days a week, at (708) 486-2600 or email info@mimithealth.com.


MIMIT Health, Interventional Cardiologists, Radiologists, and Vascular Surgeons Report Benefit in Use of Motorized C-arm

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Cardiac catheterization and angiography, in general, are still primary imaging modalities for the treatment of a variety of cardiovascular diseases. Technological advancements incorporated into fluoroscopic equipment have improved its design, mobility, imaging quality and efficiency. At Jackson Memorial Hospital in Miami, Florida, interventional cardiologist Cesar Mendoza, MD, FACC, stated that these were the qualities they were looking for when deciding to upgrade their equipment, and the Ziehm Vision RFD Hybrid Edition CMOSline flat panel motorized C-arm was the one that best fit their expectations.

“After having a bit more than 1 year of experience with a motorized C-arm, we are very satisfied with its performance. It has helped to streamline the daily cath lab patient flow, especially the one corresponding to our Heart Failure/Transplant service. Alleviating the caseload (20-25 cases per week) of this busy service in our hospital was a remarkable achievement,” said Dr. Mendoza. “Recognizing its value, we use this room for pre- and post-transplant right heart catheterizations, left heart catheterizations, coronary angiography, and myocardial biopsies. In addition, the electrophysiology team uses it for implantation of devices, and the interventional cardiology team for performing diagnostic and simple percutaneous coronary interventions.”

In this particular lab, the performance of more complex interventional procedures is limited by room size rather than by the capability of the Ziehm C-arm. Dr. Mendoza noted, “Imaging quality provided by Ziehm’s CMOS technology is as comparable as the one provided by the other fixed equipment available in our other rooms. Anecdotally, the first case done with the Ziehm C-arm was an emergent procedure performed in a patient with a large inferior ST-segment elevation myocardial infarction and cardiogenic shock. He required a complex intervention of the right coronary artery, including distal bifurcation stenting and hemodynamic support with an intra-aortic balloon pump. The motorized C-arm performed very well, demonstrating its capacity as a reliable backup when an emergency ensues. Its simplicity of use, optimal imaging quality, and versatility are encouraging features. From my own experience, I have no doubt of its real utility as a great asset for any cath lab.”

On the west coast of California, The Bay Area Vein and Vascular Center, an office-based laboratory (OBL) in Burlingame, recently replaced their older C-arm with the new motorized Ziehm Vision RFD 31 CMOSline and have been extremely pleased with its performance. The main advantages include exceptional image quality with reduced radiation for their patients, staff and interventionists. The C-arm is used mostly for lower extremity endovascular reconstruction, fistulagrams, placement and removal of tunneled catheter, ports and inferior vena cava (IVC) filters, deep venous reconstruction, and carotid and cerebral angiography. Dr. Raju Gandhi, Founder and Medical Director, Bay Area Vein and Vascular, stated, “The versatility of having the motorized C-arm along with a floating table has maximized our workflow during and between procedures. The level of efficiency is superior to the fixed units that we use at our hospitals. The support we have received from installation and maintenance over the past 6 years has been exemplary. We could not be more pleased with our recent acquisition and invite those who may be interested to visit our office-based laboratory.”

The doctors at Midwest Institute for Minimally Invasive Therapies (MIMIT) Health in Chicago, Illinois use the Ziehm Vision RFD C-arm in complicated arterial interventions in the lower extremities all the way down to the foot. The C-arm is also used in additional procedures such as transradial mesenteric procedures, spine procedures, and interventional oncology procedures. The Ziehm C-arm provides the capability to complete the entire gamut of procedures traditionally done in a hospital setting.

Dr. Paramjit “Romi” Chopra, Founder, President and CEO, stated that the Ziehm Vision RFD Hybrid Edition has helped increase their caseload and allows them to use the system the entire day due to its reliability and its water-cooled technology. Advanced Active Cooling (AAC) is a unique liquid cooling system that significantly boosts performance. AAC constantly maintains an ideal operational temperature, preventing the generator from overheating. “The Ziehm C-arm has also allowed us to become very efficient, as it’s well integrated into our network. It is a fixed lab on wheels and has definitely added value to our practice” said Dr. Chopra.

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Advantages of the Ziehm Vision RFD Hybrid Edition flat-panel detector include lowered dose, larger field of view, and a 30 x 30 flat-panel detector for excellent anatomical detail. High image resolution and sharp contrast allow the visualization of small vessels. The flat-panel square format extends the field of view offered by conventional image intensifiers, which enables significantly more information to be captured in each x-ray image.

“The workflow with the Ziehm C-arm has been excellent. For example, the vascular package is a one-button DSA and RSA, making it very simple to use. I can use it at the same time as performing a procedure and I can use it with tableside joystick controls, which is helpful. With the Ziehm Vision RFD Hybrid Edition, we have the same advantages as a fixed system, while being in a small outpatient or mobile lab. We have been able to accomplish everything we were able to do with a fixed system with the use of this unit,” said Dr. Chopra. 

What You Need to Know About Varicose Veins and Diabetes

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Diabetes does not cause varicose veins. However, studies show that diabetes and vein disease together can have a significant impact on your health.

Diabetes causes high blood sugar levels, which can lead to the weakening of the blood vessels. In turn, the venous system is more susceptible to infection. Because blood vessels and veins are prone to inflammation and weakness, there is an increased risk of circulatory issues for those diagnosed with diabetes, including an increased risk for infection.

Varicose veins usually are unsightly, large and rope-like. They often develop in the legs and can be seen from the surface of the skin. But varicose veins also can be deep within the tissues. Some varicose veins can take on the appearance of a red or blue-ish spider web. In addition to their appearance, varicose veins can cause pain, weakness, cramping and other uncomfortable symptoms.

Weight gain can be a result of diabetes and being overweight contributes to the development and advancement of varicose veins. The presence of varicose veins generally indicates inflammation, which places extra stress on the body’s immune and circulatory system. Advanced diabetes might even result in nerve and tissue damage in your legs, where varicose veins are most common.

Because both varicose veins and diabetes negatively impact circulation, the risk of developing life-threatening complications, such as deep vein thrombosis, rises. Another complication of varicose veins is the development of a skin ulcer. If a diabetic develops a skin ulcer due to an untreated varicose vein, the likelihood of a serious infection is higher.

Patients with diabetes and a predisposition to varicose veins should take extra care to reduce their risk as much as possible.

A healthy diet and regular exercise are important components in the treatment and maintenance of both diabetes and varicose veins.

Lifestyle tips for living with varicose veins and diabetes

  • Eat foods high in fiber

  • Avoid high sodium foods

  • Exercise regularly

  • Elevate your legs when at rest

  • Wear loose fitting clothes

  • Minimize sitting or standing for extended periods

Treatment options

Being a diabetic (Type I or Type II) should not prevent you from being treated for varicose veins.

If you are a diabetic, you need to be proactive when it comes to diagnosing and treating varicose veins. If you notice symptoms of varicose veins in your legs, you need to seek medical treatment as soon as possible. An experienced vein doctor will be able to evaluate your legs, diagnose vein disease and help you treat the problem effectively.

Patients living with diabetes shouldn’t ignore any venous irregularities. Inspect your legs and feet regularly. Be aware of changes in your body that might need medical attention.

A vein specialist can discuss with you a minimally invasive treatment to eliminate your varicose veins. Contemporary treatments are available for varicose veins to be treated quickly and successfully – allowing you to focus on living a healthy, active lifestyle.

MIMIT Health offers Minimally Invasive Treatments for varicose veins and Deep Vein Thrombosis (DVT). If you have any questions or would like to set up an appointment, Dr. Chopra and his associates can be reached 24 hours a day, 7 days a week, at (708) 486-2600 or email info@mimithealth.com.

MIMIT Health Helps to Create Awareness - March is National Deep-Vein Thrombosis Awareness Month | Video on how Blood Clots Form

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March is national Deep-Vein Thrombosis Awareness Month, a public health initiative aimed at raising awareness of this commonly occurring medical condition and its potentially fatal complication, pulmonary embolism. According to the American Heart Association, up to 2 million Americans are affected annually by DVT, more commonly known as blood clots. Yet, most Americans (74 percent) have little or no awareness of DVT, according to a national survey sponsored by the American Public Health Association.

Leading medical, public health and patient advocacy groups are sponsoring the observance and are working to increase awareness of the signs, symptoms and risk factors of DVT. All health professionals can help by learning more about the condition and the options available for treatment and prevention.

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About DVT

There are two types of veins: deep and superficial. Deep veins are large and surrounded by muscle in the center of a limb. DVT occurs when a thrombus (blood clot) forms in the deep vein, most often in the leg, resulting in partially or completely blocked circulation.

Symptoms of DVT can include swelling, pain, discoloration and abnormally hot skin at the affected area. Unfortunately, nearly half of DVT episodes have minimal, if any, symptoms. These “silent” afflictions are particularly worrisome. Adding to the complication, some conditions such as muscle strain, skin inflection, phlebitis – inflammation of veins – have similar symptoms, making DVT harder to diagnose. The most accurate ways to diagnose DVT are through venous ultrasound, venography and Impedance plethysmography – detection via electrodes and blood pressure cuff placed on the patient’s calf and thigh.

While DVT below the knee is unlikely to cause serious complications, clots above the knee can break off and travel up the bloodstream, resulting in a blocked blood vessel in the lung (pulmonary embolism). Other consequences are damaged blood vessels leading to blood pooling, swelling and pain in the leg, and in the most severe cases with large clots, death.

Certain individuals are more at risk for deep-vein thrombosis than others. Those with prior DVT, obesity, stroke, pregnancy, undergoing major surgery, over the age of 65 and those who are confined to long periods of immobility via travel or bed rest are more likely to be afflicted. According to the American Medical Association, approximately 2 million people suffer from DVT each year, more than the annual amount affected by heart attack or stroke.

MIMIT Health offers Minimally Invasive Treatments for Deep Vein Thrombosis (DVT). If you have any questions or would like to set up an appointment, Dr. Chopra and his associates can be reached 24 hours a day, 7 days a week, at (708) 486-2600 or email info@mimithealth.com.

SAVE THE DATE! Dr. Paramjit "Romi" Chopra to speak at The Advanced Revascularization-Chapter XII (ARCH) Symposium

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The Advanced Revascularization-Chapter XII (ARCH) Symposium held in St. Louis is the nation’s premier interventional cardiology course specifically designed for the busy practicing physician and trainees. ARCH 2019 will focus on evidence based data, newer technological advances, case-based discussions, tips and tricks in complex cases, innovative therapeutic strategies that will enable physicians to treat their patients with high-risk and complex coronary, peripheral vascular and structural anatomy.

Attendees will learn from experts on the use of novel techniques and interventional tools, new CTO techniques, hemodynamic support during high-risk Coronary, Peripheral and Structural Interventions and decompensated heart failure, structural heart disease interventions and novel intravascular coronary anatomy/physiology techniques. In addition, use of newer adjunctive imaging modalities to optimize Coronary, Peripheral and Structural Interventions outcomes will be presented.

Participants will observe live cases and hear from International experts who will present their data and share their expertise. With a strong emphasis on participant-faculty interactions, attendees will learn the latest advances in interventional cardiology.

If you would like to attend this event, please register here

What is Deep Vein Thrombosis (DVT)? Scary Symptoms Medical Website Interviews Dr. Paramjit "Romi" Chopra on Risks

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What is Deep Vein Thrombosis (DVT)?

Deep vein thrombosis (DVT) occurs when a blood clot (thrombus) forms in one or more of the deep veins in your body, usually in your legs. Deep vein thrombosis can cause leg pain or swelling, but also can occur with no symptoms.

Deep vein thrombosis can develop if you have certain medical conditions that affect how your blood clots. It can also happen if you don't move for a long time, such as after surgery or an accident, or when you're confined to bed.

Deep vein thrombosis can be very serious because blood clots in your veins can break loose, travel through your bloodstream and lodge in your lungs, blocking blood flow (pulmonary embolism).


Symptoms

Deep vein thrombosis signs and symptoms can include:

Swelling in the affected leg. Rarely, there's swelling in both legs.

  • Pain in your leg. The pain often starts in your calf and can feel like cramping or soreness.

  • Red or discolored skin on the leg.

  • A feeling of warmth in the affected leg.

Deep vein thrombosis can occur without noticeable symptoms.

When to see a doctor

If you develop signs or symptoms of deep vein thrombosis, contact your doctor.

If you develop signs or symptoms of a pulmonary embolism — a life-threatening complication of deep vein thrombosis — seek immediate medical attention.

The warning signs and symptoms of a pulmonary embolism include:

  • Sudden shortness of breath

  • Chest pain or discomfort that worsens when you take a deep breath or when you cough

  • Feeling lightheaded or dizzy, or fainting

  • Rapid pulse

  • Coughing up blood

Diagnosis

To diagnose deep vein thrombosis, your doctor will ask you about your symptoms. You'll also have a physical exam so that your doctor can check for areas of swelling, tenderness or discoloration on your skin. Depending on how likely you are to have a blood clot, your doctor might suggest tests, including:

  • Ultrasound. A wandlike device (transducer) placed over the part of your body where there's a clot sends sound waves into the area. As the sound waves travel through your tissue and reflect back, a computer transforms the waves into a moving image on a video screen. A clot might be visible in the image.

    Sometimes a series of ultrasounds are done over several days to determine whether a blood clot is growing or to check for a new one.

  • Blood test. Almost all people who develop severe deep vein thrombosis have an elevated blood level of a substance called D dimer.

  • Venography. A dye is injected into a large vein in your foot or ankle. An X-ray creates an image of the veins in your legs and feet, to look for clots. However, less invasive methods of diagnosis, such as ultrasound, can usually confirm the diagnosis.

  • CT or MRI scans. Either can provide visual images of your veins and might show if you have a clot. Sometimes these scans performed for other reasons reveal a clot.

MIMIT Health offers Minimally Invasive Treatments for Deep Vein Thrombosis (DVT). If you have any questions or would like to set up an appointment, Dr. Chopra and his associates can be reached 24 hours a day, 7 days a week, at (708) 486-2600 or email info@mimithealth.com.

Read Scary Symptoms entire Interview here.

We’re Hiring Operating Room (OR) Technicians!

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MIMIT Health is looking for dedicated and caring medical professionals including Medical Assistants, Operating Room (OR) Technicians, and more. If you are interested or know someone interested in working for MIMIT Health, please share or click here or please send a short cover letter and your resume to info@mimithealth.com

MIMIT Health is looking for team members who demonstrate compassion, accountability, respect, and excellence with the understanding that it’s the patients we serve and who are at the center of all we do.

Digital transformation in healthcare remains complex and challenging

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The famous Henry Ford quote seems just as true today as it was at the time, about wanting faster horses. I know from my own experience when I have asked business sponsors, managers and clinicians about problems or pain points they often reach for the nearest solution within sight. This approach misses the deeper technology requirements and fundamentally isn’t really transformative.

The hard part of digital transformation in healthcare is challenging how we work right now and establishing why we maintain the status quo? In other sectors such as retail, travel and banking, society has benefited from a very data driven technological approach. In those sectors they’ve redefined the customer experience in a way that hasn’t been realised in healthcare.

Healthcare is ready for digital disruption

Whilst progress has been made in digital healthcare, it hasn’t necessarily been transformational and in many cases is a simple conversion of analogue to electronic. Certainly the areas of eReferral, ePrescribing and eHealth Records haven’t undergone revolutionary change, they’re simply the transference of what were analogue forms and processes into electronic versions of the same. In healthcare transformation so many processes remain ripe for digital disruption.

We’re heading into the post-digital era where healthcare organisations will need to adopt new and emerging technology. These new technologies will drive change in an environment where the sector already has a multitude of existing digital tools. The new technology that is already appearing in healthcare includes artificial intelligence, distributed ledger technology, extended reality and quantum computing.

Most industries that have undergone digital transformation have done so by adopting a data-driven approach. In healthcare we’re entering an era where data will be generated at scale. Through genomics, IoT and citizen facing applications, alongside traditional health data, new data points will emerge with patterns that were not previously identifiable. This also provides us with an unparalleled opportunity to prevent illness and offer treatment with much greater precision.

Other sectors have all been through this disruptive change whether that was consumer banking, mobile telecommunications or online retail, they’ve all had to overcome new entrants to the market that are not part of legacy, but more importantly these new entrants will redefine healthcare as we know it.

Challenging traditional approaches to healthtech

In all likelihood it’ll be technology that redefines healthcare and this will be driven by data. However the approach is unlikely to try and incrementally fix yesterday’s problems but instead create a new endpoint with a new way of getting there. This will challenge traditional ways of approaching healthcare technology and will almost certainly threaten the very linear delivery models of the past.

Technology needs to normalise as part of healthcare delivery, for example Natural Language Processing technology is often perceived as standalone technology but it’s power will emerge when it’s incorporated into other digital products and it moves from processing to aiding actions and supporting decisions.

Our health system in the UK is very much designed around reacting to illness, the very origins were to treat illness, so it’s not surprising that this is how the system has evolved. Much of our framework for digital transformation has been about making small incremental gains in managing illness and its associated workload. If the system could pivot to one which is based on prediction then some of the illness may be prevented before it progresses and equally some of the workload may not exist in the same way.

Empowering the patient

The components of a healthcare system haven’t changed very much, they still consist of doctors and other clinicians, in a physical location with waiting areas for patients. Whilst we may now use computers instead of physical appointment books, the concept and the model hasn’t changed very much in the last 100 years. If we could redefine healthcare, how much of it would we put back in the hands of a patient? Could our delivery model and physical healthcare spaces be reimagined?

Digital transformation in healthcare is reliant on a new approach to digital development. The technology can’t be viewed as being separate to the delivery of services but must be seen as part of the service. The relationship between citizen and healthcare needs to be redefined so that the underlying components of healthcare can be re-engineered.

I hope we’ll look back one day from a point where the challenge isn’t faster ambulances or waiting time in the emergency department, but instead the techniques through which we process mass data to predict and prevent the event from occurring.

Article: https://bddy.me/2X9H6cR

Apple is getting so serious about health, it's started hosting heart-health events at Apple Stores

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Apple hosted its first health-focused event at its Union Square store in San Francisco on Monday evening. It started with a panel on the topic of heart health and ended with an walk around the block to demonstrate the activity features on the Apple Watch.

Apple has not previously hosted any dedicated health events at its Apple Stores, but it has scheduled three this month, including in Chicago and New York. The events are in support of Heart Month, as heart health is a big area of focus for the Apple Watch, which includes an optical sensor to measure the user's heart rate and (in the new version) an electrocardiogram to measure the heart's rhythm.

These events are yet another signal that the company is positioning health care is key to its future. Its executives have said as much, with the Tim Cook noting to CNBC's Jim Cramer that health will be the company's "greatest contribution to mankind." As it scales back in other departments, like self-driving cars, the company is growing its team and making some big investments in health.

The company's CEO Tim Cook even tweeted about the event on Tuesday: Read more

Eating 'ultraprocessed' foods accelerates your risk of early death, study says

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“This trend may drive an increase of early deaths due to chronic illnesses, including cancer and cardiovascular disease”

The quick and easy noshes you love are chipping away at your mortality one nibble at a time, according to new research from France: We face a 14% higher risk of early death with each 10% increase in the amount of ultraprocessed foods we eat.

"Ultraprocessed foods are manufactured industrially from multiple ingredients that usually include additives used for technological and/or cosmetic purposes," wrote the authors of the study, published Monday in the journal JAMA Internal Medicine. "Ultraprocessed foods are mostly consumed in the form of snacks, desserts, or ready-to-eat or -heat meals," and their consumption "has largely increased during the past several decades."

This trend may drive an increase of early deaths due to chronic illnesses, including cancer and cardiovascular disease, they say.

Ultraprocessed foods are gaining ground in our diets

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In the United States, 61% of an adult's total diet comes from ultraprocessed foods, in Canada, it is 62%, and in the UK, that proportion is 63%, a recent study found. Yet research also indicates that eating ultraprocessed foods can lead to obesity, high blood pressure and cancer, the study authors say.

To understand the relationship between ultraprocessed foods and the risk of an earlier-than-expected death, the researchers enlisted the help of 44,551 French adults 45 and older for two years. Their average age was 57, and nearly 73% of the participants were women. All provided 24-hour dietary records every six months in addition to completing questionnaires about their health (including body-mass index and other measurements), physical activities and sociodemographics.

The researchers calculated each participant's overall dietary intake and consumption of ultraprocessed foods.

Ultraprocessed foods accounted for more than 14% of the weight of total food consumed and about 29% of total calories, they found. Ultraprocessed food consumption was associated with younger age, lower income, lower educational level, living alone, higher BMI and lower physical activity level.

One serving of fried chicken a day linked to 13% higher risk of death, study finds

Read entire article

If you have any questions or would like to set up an appointment, Dr. Chopra and his associates can be reached 24 hours a day, 7 days a week, at (708) 486-2600 or email info@mimithealth.com.

How Exercise Can Help in Peripheral Artery Disease

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IT'S SOMETIMES CALLED "window-shopper's disease." As walking brings on leg cramps and pain, people with peripheral artery disease must frequently stop for breaks. When they rest, pain subsides. When they resume walking, PAD pain kicks back in.

PAD is common among older adults. About one in every 20 Americans over age 50 has PAD, with up to 12 million people affected overall, according to the National Heart, Lung, and Blood Institute.

People may mistakenly believe painful walking is part of normal aging. However, PAD is linked to higher risks of cardiovascular complications such as heart attacks or strokes. PAD shouldn't be suffered stoically or in silence. If you have symptoms, you need a medical evaluation.

Exercise is a first-line treatment for PAD. The catch is that walking discomfort may cause PAD sufferers to shy away from movement. Fortunately, structured exercise therapy can help. Better walking ability, improved cardiovascular test results and increased quality of life occur in patients who complete these programs, multiple studies show.

Supervised by health care experts and now covered by Medicare, exercise programs help PAD patients build endurance and tolerance and learn how to safely walk past the point of discomfort.

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ABCs of PAD

Here are some of the basics of PAD and exercise treatment:

What is peripheral artery disease? Peripheral artery disease, also called peripheral arterial disease, is a painful, chronic condition involving blockages in the arteries supplying blood to the legs. PAD is a type of peripheral vascular disease, which refers to any disease involving the vascular system outside the heart.

Normally, healthy arteries carry oxygen-rich blood from the heart to the rest of the body. In patients with PAD, atherosclerosis, or narrowing and hardening of the arteries caused by fatty plaque, interferes with blood flow to the extremities – usually the legs, although arms are sometimes affected.

Cramping, pain and fatigue of the leg and hip muscles when walking or climbing stairs are the most common symptoms of PAD.

What is claudication? Claudication is the cramping pain particularly associated with PAD. Sometimes called intermittent claudication, it's usually caused by a lack of blood flow while exercising, but can also occur at rest as PAD worsens. Advanced PAD symptoms may include skin ulcerations or sores and cold, discolored, bluish legs, feet and toes. Some patients experience weakness of the extremities.

How is PAD treated? Diagnosis for PAD is done with a simple, noninvasive test using blood pressure cuffs and Doppler ultrasound. If blood pressure in the ankles is lower than in the arms, that's suggestive of PAD. Vascular specialists may order additional imaging tests of the blood vessels, called angiograms.

PAD is sometimes treated with medication such as blood thinners like aspirin to prevent clots, statin drugs to slow plaque buildup and blood pressure drugs.

Smoking and diabetes are strong risk factors for PAD. Diabetes management, smoking cessation, meticulous foot care and staying physically active are essential treatment components.

Read more

If you have any questions or would like to set up an appointment, Dr. Chopra and his associates can be reached 24 hours a day, 7 days a week, at (708) 486-2600 or email info@mimithealth.com.

Can varicose veins lead to heart disease?

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The appearance of thick, twisty varicose veins can be a bit scary. It is normal to wonder if the protruding veins are a sign of a potential cardiac concern.

There is no reason to live with unsightly, heavy, tired legs these days. Modern advancements in varicose vein treatments are minimally invasive. Patients usually are home on the same day as the procedure.

How do varicose veins affect the heart and cardiovascular system? Can varicose veins cause heart problems?

While the presence of varicose veins indicates a problem with moving blood back to the heart for oxygenation, generally a diagnosis of varicose veins does not put you at a higher risk for cardiac issues. Heart disease and poor circulation are related to the arterial system while the venous system is linked to varicose veins.

However, in some cases, the venous system can be affected by a cardiac issue. For instance, a patient with heart disease and varicose veins could be at higher risk for developing swelling in the legs or an infection around a varicose vein.

Another complication from varicose veins is deep vein thrombosis, or DVT, which can form deep in a varicose vein. If this clot loosens and breaks free it can travel to the lungs, and the result can be a potentially fatal pulmonary embolism. Or, the clot can obstruct blood flow, which could lead to other health risks.

On the positive side, both the arterial and venous systems respond favorably to a heart healthy lifestyle including diet, exercise and hydration.

About 15 percent of American adults have venous disease. The veins become damaged or weak, and blood flows backwards and causes the veins to stretch, swell and twist.

You have a higher risk of developing varicose veins if the disease runs in your family, you are pregnant, you are overweight, or you are not active.

Poor circulation in one or more veins can lead to the blood pooling, often in the leg, which causes varicose veins. Venous disease can worsen over time due to the pressure created by the backflow of blood in the legs.

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Symptoms of venous disease may include swelling or heaviness in legs, leg pain or muscle cramping, visible varicose or spider veins, skin discoloration, or restless legs.

Three tips to improve vein health

The following tips not only promote varicose vein health, but they prevent poor circulation in the arteries (peripheral arterial disease), too.

Lose weight

Not only can losing weight help prevent varicose veins by reducing pressure on your venous system, it can reduce some of the symptoms from varicose veins such as heavy, tired legs.

Exercise regularly

Blood pools in your legs and ankles when you sit or stand for long periods. If you have a desk job, commit to a 10-minute walk once a day while at the office. If you stand for long periods, take a break and elevate your legs and make sure to find time to exercise such as walking, gentle yoga or swimming.

Quit smoking

Smoking reduces blood flow, constricts blood vessels and thickens blood. If you want healthy cardiac and venous systems, do not smoke.

There is no reason to live with unsightly, heavy, tired legs these days. Modern advancements in varicose vein treatments are minimally invasive. Patients usually are home on the same day as the procedure.

If you have any questions or would like to set up an appointment, Dr. Chopra and his associates can be reached 24 hours a day, 7 days a week, at (708) 486-2600 or email info@mimithealth.com.