MIMIT Health Partners with Salesforce to Provide Patients World-Class Healthcare

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MIMIT Health met with the Salesforce Ignite team to discuss strategic planning using the V2MOM model developed by Salesforce, and discussed leveraging technology that allows precision and agility enabling transformational change. Other topics of discussion were focused on improving and optimizing operational efficiency via the Health Cloud, maximizing technology to improve patient outcomes, and future business development.

“My sincere gratitude to Salesforce as an organization for being such an amazing and valuable strategic partner. The assistance and advice you provided as we implement V2MOM at MIMIT Health are priceless. Your engagement and strategic advice were invaluable and inspirational.” Said MIMIT Health CEO and Founder, Dr. Paramjit “Romi” Chopra.

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“As an innovative, transformative health care organization, we are overjoyed and excited to have Salesforce as our core platform and its ecosystem with super effective solutions.” Dr. Chopra added

Salesforce Ignite is a specialized program that helps fast-growing companies like MIMIT Health better engage customers, employees, and stakeholders with connected experiences. The focused discussions between MIMIT Health and Salesforce help to build digital dexterity by finding solutions that work within existing environments.

MIMIT Health is always looking to improve existing processes and learn new strategies to foster innovation and promote positive change leveraging the Salesforce ecosystem that turns ideas into reality.

MIMIT Health provides world class health care combined with minimally invasive treatments by industry-leading physicians and surgeons. Along with our best-in-class health care, we focus on our patients "living their best life" with healthy lifestyle strategies and wellness solutions.

If you have any questions about minimally invasive surgeries or would like to refer a patient, MIMIT Health can be reached 24 hours a day, 7 days a week, at (708) 486-2600 or email info@mimithealth.com 

Today is Global Running Day | MIMIT Health Encourages Everyone to Get Moving

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Fitness is one of the best predictors of survival and longevity in people both with and without heart disease. #GlobalRunningDay

What is Global Running Day?

Global Running Day is a worldwide celebration of running that encourages everyone to get moving. It doesn’t matter how fast you run or how far you go—what’s important is that you take part, and how you do it is up to you. Run a lap around your block, take your dog for a long walk, or call your friends for a pick-up game in the park. The important thing is that you have fun being active—and you inspire others to join you.


If exercise is one of the best things you can do for your heart and your body, then inactivity has the opposite effect.

“If you want to age the equivalent of 30 years go home, get in bed for three weeks and get up maybe for meals or bathroom breaks, that’s it,” says Dr. Barry Franklin, director of preventive cardiology and cardiac rehabilitation at Beaumont.

Exercise has positive effects on more than just your muscle tone - though that brings benefits beyond simple vanity, too. It can help you prevent heart disease and lower the risk of chronic diseases like diabetes. Regular exercise also:

  • reduces body weight and fat stores

  • lowers blood pressure

  • improves the body’s ability to handle blood sugar

Dr. Franklin says researchers at Beaumont have found that fitness is one of the best predictors of survival and longevity in people both with and without heart disease.

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MORE THAN ONE KIND OF EXERCISE

Broadly speaking, there are two major categories of exercise: aerobic or endurance exercise, defined as large-muscle rhythmic exercises like walking, running or cycling; and weight or strength training. The latter is especially valuable for middle-aged or older people.

“The reason I say that is that as we get older, what happens is we tend to lose lean body mass, muscle mass, and we tend to gain fat mass,” Dr. Franklin says. “The scale weight may not change all that much, but it’s very misleading.

“What resistance training can do is maintain or increase lean body mass as we age, which also tends to burn more calories. So that’s very important.”

Also important for people as they age: stretching exercises, like yoga or tai chi. If done regularly, they can help prevent falls and injury, Dr. Franklin says.

SMALL INCREMENTS WORK JUST AS WELL

When it comes to exercising, the official guidelines from the American Heart Association call for 150 minutes a week of moderate exercise or 75 minutes per week of vigorous exercise - or 30 minutes a day for five days a week.

But if you’re worried that it’s too hard to carve out that much time in a single block, don’t be. Studies now show that you can do three, 10-minute bouts of aerobic exercise “and get the same or better benefits as if you do one, 30-minute bout,” Dr. Franklin says. That’s because every time you exercise, your metabolism goes up and stays elevated for as much as 90 minutes, burning more calories than normal even after you’ve stopped exercising.

“You don’t have to put the dollar in the piggy bank all at one time,” Dr. Franklin says. “I tell patients, ‘You can put four quarters in there at different times and get the same or more benefit.’”

WHICH EXERCISES ARE BEST, AND WHICH SHOULD YOU AVOID?

While running, cycling, dancing and swimming are all great ways to get your heart rate up, scientists widely consider a vigorous walk to be great for your heart. And as Dr. Franklin notes, even taking regular breaks from your desk to walk around the office or visit a coworker you need to speak with can add up to big health benefits.

But if you haven’t exercised in years, don’t go out and immediately start running. “I don’t care if you were a former athlete, start walking,” Dr. Franklin says. Then gradually increase your speed to start short bursts of jogging.

Another dangerous activity is shoveling snow which Dr. Franklin says is “probably the most hazardous activity available today.” In 2003, Beaumont researchers published the results of a study in the American Journal of Cardiology after two major snowfalls in the Detroit region in which 36 people dropped dead after shoveling snow.

It’s dangerous for several reasons, Dr. Franklin says. First, it involves arm work, which is more taxing than leg work. Secondly, people tend to strain when hoisting big shovelfuls of snow and hold their breath, which can cause big fluctuations in heart rate and blood pressure. Thirdly, the cold wind tends to constrict blood vessels and arteries to the heart, so oxygenated blood tends to pool to the lower extremities instead of to the heart and head, where it’s most needed.

MIMIT Health provides world class health care combined with minimally invasive treatments by industry-leading physicians and surgeons. Along with our best-in-class health care, we focus on our patients "living their best life" with healthy lifestyle strategies and wellness solutions.

If you have any questions about minimally invasive surgeries or would like to refer a patient, MIMIT Health can be reached 24 hours a day, 7 days a week, at (708) 486-2600 or email info@mimithealth.com 


June Is Men's Health Month | Men's Health Week June 10-16 Celebrates its 25th Anniversary

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This June, families and communities around the nation are bringing men’s health to the forefront with the kick-off of the 2019 Men’s Health Month, an annual awareness period solely dedicated to education and activities on the health and wellness of men and boys. This year also marks the 25th year of National Men’s Health Week (NMHW), a special awareness period recognized by Congress. Men’s Health Month is built on the pillars of AWARENESS – PREVENTION – EDUCATION – FAMILY.

This year, Men’s Health Week will be celebrated on June 10-16, ending on Father’s Day. The week is celebrated as International Men’s Health Week around the globe. During this time, health care professionals, private corporations, faith-based community organizations, and government agencies, plan activities that focus on the health and well-being of boys, men, and their families. 

“Men continue to lag behind women in health outcomes while leading the top causes of death in the U.S., which is why an awareness period like Men’s Health Month is critical for men, boys, and communities to be more engaged in their health,” said Ana Fadich-Tomsic, VP of Men’s Health Network (MHN). “Consequently, more health dangers loom for men who continue to suffer from the lack of access to mental health services and the impact of the ongoing opioid crisis. Now, more than ever, support is needed from policymakers, state and federal legislators, the media, and our private and non-profit partners to help fight these systemic issues and save lives.”

Over 350 mayors and governors across the country have recognized June as Men's Health Month with official proclamations. These proclamations are displayed in Congress. Report cards on the status of the health and well-being of boys and men in each state are available at the State of Men’s Health web site. Free resources and toolkits are available in both English and Spanish at www.MensHealthMonth.com

“Although we continue to make progress in raising awareness about the importance of overall preventative health screenings, in addition to self-care, mental health, and the ongoing opioid epidemic, many men and women are still neglecting their own health care needs,” said Beth Battaglino, RN, CEO, HealthyWomen. “We share in the goal of Men’s Health Month to raise awareness, educate, provide resources and remove any stigmas that are associated with these important health topics that affect so many men and young boys.”

Men still face challenges in health outcomes that extend beyond their physical wellness. This year, men and boys continue to suffer a “silent crisis” in accessing mental health services. Men are more likely to commit suicide and suffer from depression. Additionally, the ongoing opioid crisis has also hit men hard as they are more than twice as likely to die from opioid use than women, according to the Kaiser Family Foundation.

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“Men are significantly impacted by the opioid crisis. In 2017, 68 percent of Americans who died from opioid overdoses were men (CDC),” said Holly Jespersen, Senior Communications Manager of Shatterproof. “Shatterproof is committed to Men’s Health Month and continues to work towards ending the unjust stigma of addiction and ensuring treatment based on science is available to all who need it."

"The Partnership for Safe Medicines is proud to support awareness around Men's Health Month. Too many men in America have been victimized by the counterfeit pill crisis that has currently spread to 48 states and killed people in over 30 states," said PSM Executive Director Shabbir Imber Safdar. "We are hopeful that our efforts will result in more men learning about the dangers of counterfeits and fake online pharmacies and engaging in safer behavior.”

A key part of the continued momentum is the annual event and social media campaign, including:

• SaludTues & Men’s Health Network Twitter Chat: “Men’s Health Month” and other partners 1:00 p.m. EDT on June 18

• The “Men & the Opioid Crisis” Twitter Chat with Men’s Health Network and partners is scheduled for June 26 at 2 PM EST

• Congress joins the celebration with a Congressional Workout, planned for June 5.

• #ShowUsYourBlue campaign: People all over the world take pictures of themselves and others wearing blue to increase awareness for men’s health and posting the photos on social media with the #ShowUsYourBlue hashtag 

• June 14 is Wear Blue Friday, the #ShowUsYourBlue social media storm where individuals are encouraged to take selfies of themselves wearing blue during the day and post to social media using the hashtag

MIMIT Health provides world class health care combined with minimally invasive treatments by industry-leading physicians and surgeons. Along with our best-in-class health care, we focus on our patients "living their best life" with healthy lifestyle strategies and wellness solutions.

If you have any questions about minimally invasive surgeries or would like to refer a patient, MIMIT Health can be reached 24 hours a day, 7 days a week, at (708) 486-2600 or email info@mimithealth.com 


Men’s Health Month and Men’s Health Week are sponsored by Men’s Health Network (MHN), which maintains a list of experts and spokespersons on all areas of male health and wellness, including fatherhood issues. Men’s Health Month supporters include Sanofi-Regeneron, Genomic Health, and Pfizer, Inc.

What are Minimally Invasive Procedures? | MIMIT Health

Minimally invasive procedures allow your physician to use techniques that limit the size and number of cuts, or incisions, that they need to make. It’s typically considered safer than open surgery. You’ll usually recover more quickly, spend less time in the hospital, and feel more comfortable while you heal.

In traditional open surgery, your surgeon makes one large cut to see the part of your body that they’re operating on. In minimally invasive surgery, your surgeon uses small tools, cameras, and lights that fit through several tiny cuts in your skin. This allows your surgeon to perform surgery without opening a lot of skin and muscle.

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Some minimally invasive procedures are done with robotic technology that allows more precise control over the surgery. Other minimally invasive surgeries are done without robotic assistance.

Minimally Invasive Procedures we offer:

Angiography
This means taking an x-ray while injecting dye to study blood flow in the arteries. The resulting image can be used to examine almost any artery within the body. Often, less-invasive tests, such as magnetic resonance angiography and CT angiography, are used as well.

Carotid angiography/stents
Using imaging for guidance, the physician threads a catheter to the carotid artery, then inflates a balloon to open the blood vessel where it is narrowed or blocked. In some cases, this is then held open with a stent, a tiny metal mesh cylinder.

Angioplasty/stents
In some cases of peripheral artery disease, your physician may recommend angioplasty and stenting. This procedure is considered minimally invasive in comparison to open surgery. It is most effective for more localized blockages in the larger arteries. The physician threads a thin tube through a blood vessel in the arm or groin up to the involved site in the artery. The tube has a tiny balloon on the end. When the tube is in place, the physician inflates the balloon to push the plaque outward against the wall of the artery. This widens the artery and restores blood flow.

Phlebectomy
This is a method of removing varicose veins on the surface of the legs. It is done in the office under local anesthesia. It involves making tiny punctures or incisions through which the veins are removed. The incisions are so small no stitches are required and the patient is able to walk the next day.

Radiofrequency Ablation
This involves inserting a thin, flexible tube called a catheter into the varicose vein. The tip of the catheter heats the walls of the vein and destroys the vein tissue. Once destroyed, the vein is no longer able to carry blood and is absorbed by the body.

Sclerotherapy
This is the most common way to treat both spider and varicose veins. A saline or chemical solution is injected into the veins. This causes them to harden, so they no longer fill with blood. Blood that normally returns to the heart through these veins will now return through other veins. The veins that received the injection eventually shrivel and disappear, and the scar tissue is absorbed by the body.

Coming Soon!
Robotic surgery or robotic-assisted surgery
: Similar to standard laparoscopic surgery, this newer technique allows a surgeon to control a robot that moves the surgical instruments.

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Minimally Invasive Procedures can help these diseases:

  • Varicose Veins (Venous Disease)

  • Vascular Disease (Peripheral Artery Disease)

  • Spinal Pain/Pain Management (Kyphoplasty)

  • Benign Prostatic Hypertrophy (BPH)

  • Diabetes Care/Management

  • Abdominal Aortic Aneurysm (AAA)

  • Cancer Management

  • Uterine Fibroid

MIMIT Health provides world class health care combined with minimally invasive treatments by industry-leading physicians and surgeons. Along with our best-in-class health care, we focus on our patients "living their best life" with healthy lifestyle strategies and wellness solutions.

If you have any questions about minimally invasive surgeries or would like to refer a patient, MIMIT Health can be reached 24 hours a day, 7 days a week, at (708) 486-2600 or email info@mimithealth.com 

Less is More with Minimally Invasive Treatments at MIMIT Health

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More and more patients are requesting minimally invasive treatments as an option to surgery. MIMIT Health offers an environment where doctors are constantly encouraged to grow, learn and refine their skills with minimally invasive procedures. Because of this nurturing atmosphere, our physicians are leaders in their field, involved in pioneering new techniques, working with companies to refine instrumentation and technology, conducting research, and training other surgeons from around the nation and world.

Minimally invasive procedures are a great alternative to open surgery. Here are some of the many advantages of minimally invasive surgery:

  • A few small cuts versus a large incision

  • Less trauma to the muscles, nerves and tissues

  • Less bleeding

  • Less scarring

  • Less trauma to organs

  • Less pain and reduced use of narcotics

  • Less hospital time

  • Less effect on the immune system

MIMIT Health provides minimally invasive treatments performed by industry-leading physicians led by the renowned Dr Romi Chopra. Integrated with our best-in-class health care, we focus on patients "living their best life”
 
We call this enlightened health care.

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Here are some of our services:

  • Varicose Veins (Venous Disease)

  • Vascular Disease (Peripheral Artery Disease)

  • Spinal Pain/Pain Management (Kyphoplasty)

  • Benign Prostatic Hypertrophy (BPH)

  • Diabetes Care/Management

  • Abdominal Aortic Aneurysm (AAA)

  • Cancer Management

  • Uterine Fibroids

If you have any questions or would like to refer a patient, MIMIT Health can be reached 24 hours a day, 7 days a week, at (708) 486-2600 or email info@mimithealth.com.
 
We’re Hiring!
MIMIT Health is looking for dedicated and caring medical professionals including Medical Assistants, Operating Room (OR) Technicians, Physician Liaisons and more. If you are interested, or know someone interested in working for MIMIT Health, please send a short cover letter and your resume to info@mimithealth.com. Also check out our Career page.

MIMIT Health's Dr. Paramjit “Romi” Chopra Talks With YourTango, A Leading Online Magazine, About Diabetes

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6 Subtle Signs Of Diabetes You Might Miss . . .

Don't ignore what your body is saying.

We'd expect some hints that we have diabetes, but that's not always the case. Most adults diagnosed have no diabetes symptoms whatsoever, and in those who do have symptoms, they are often very subtle and can be easily missed.

“The most common symptoms are frequent urination (peeing constantly), excessive thirst (because you are peeing constantly), and blurry vision (due to fluid buildup in the eyes),” says Dr. Cara Pensabene of EHE Health.  "Other signs of diabetes include numbness or tingling in your hands and feet, unintentional weight loss, increased fatigue, skin darkening (in areas like the back of the neck, under the armpits, or in the groin), and frequent (vaginal) yeast infections in women." 

Be sure to look out for the following signs of diabetes, as some can be extremely serious and lead to further complications.

1. Fatigue

Fatigue is different than just being tired, which can often be relieved through rest. Even after resting, someone with fatigue still feel exhaustion and lethargic.

Why? According to Dr. Romi Chopra, an interventional radiologist and founder of MIMIT Health, “This happens in those with diabetes as a result of being overweight, change in blood sugar levels, or from mental and emotional issues associated with not being diagnosed with diabetes and wondering what is going on.”

2. Thirst

Thirst and/or increased urination is due to the production of excess sugar, which builds up in the blood.

“This build-up causes the kidneys to work overtime to try and absorb or filter excess sugar. When it is not absorbed, it is discharged in the urine, which depletes the body of fluids, causing the increased urination. Due to increased urination and loss of fluids, the body becomes dehydrated and thirsty,” Dr. Chopra warns.

3. Hunger and/or weight loss

Dr. Chopra says, “Weight loss and increased hunger also come as a side effect of increased urination because it is a loss of calories. Simultaneously, diabetes is keeping sugar from the cells, which is the cause for the increased hunger.”

4. Vision issues

Blurry vision is often a symptom of diabetes that goes unnoticed. But what causes it?

According to Dr. Chopra, “It is caused by the build-up of sugar in the blood pulling fluids from the body, including the lens of the eyes. If this is left untreated, new blood vessels may develop behind the eye, damaging the existing vessels, which can eventually lead to vision loss.”

5. Horizontal ridges on fingernails

“While these are not always a cause for concern as they may only be a symptom of acute trauma, horizontal ridges on the fingernails may indicate a more serious illness like pneumonia or diabetes,” warns Caleb Backe, Certified Personal Trainer for Maple Holistics.

6. Fruity breath

If your breath smells sweet in the morning, this could be another sign of a bigger issue that you shouldn’t ignore. “Fruity breath could indicate pre-diabetes symptoms that result from inflammatory issues,” says Backe.

7. Tingling, burning, or foot numbness

This may have happened because you wore a pair of ill-fitting shoes, but it could also mean you have prediabetes, and it’s a sign of elevated blood sugar levels.

“The illness causes damage to the circulatory and nervous systems. Prediabetes usually has no symptoms, so full-blown diabetes is usually unpreventable. If your feet feel weird for more than a few weeks, you should make an appointment,” Backe advises.

If you have any questions or would like to set up an appointment, MIMIT Health can be reached 24 hours a day, 7 days a week, at (708) 486-2600 or email info@mimithealth.com.



MIMIT Health | We are Peripheral Artery Disease (PAD) Specialists

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Talking with a health care professional about peripheral artery disease (PAD) is important, but you might not be sure how to do it. You want to ask questions that will get you the information you need to make the best decisions about your health. Or maybe you’ve already been diagnosed with PAD, but you still have questions or concerns about your health or treatment plan.

For example, your doctor may recommend lifestyle changes or minimally invasive medical procedures. Or your doctor could suggest amputation, a common treatment for advanced stages of PAD. Treatment options are constantly advancing, and today’s techniques to treat PAD are very different than they were just five years ago. If you think you may be at risk for PAD, click here for a list of questions you can use to help guide your talk with your doctor about the risk factors for this disease.

If you have been diagnosed with PAD and you’ve been told you need an amputation due to PAD or CLI (critical limb ischemia) or that you are at risk for an amputation, these questions can help to guide a conversation with your doctor:

  • Are there tests I should have that can provide more information about my condition?

  • Does your clinic/hospital have a limb salvage program?

  • What treatment options do I have other than amputation?

  • What benefits do these options offer compared to amputation?

  • What are potential complications associated with these alternatives?

  • What type of post-treatment recovery should I expect?

  • What type of training and experience do you have with these options?

You can learn about the disease by reading this website. But don’t wait – early detection and treatment are important – talk to a health care professional about PAD now.

Not all health care professionals are PAD specialists – and not all PAD specialists use the most current treatment techniques – so it is important to get a second opinion that could help guide your treatment decisions. If your doctor or hospital does not have a limb salvage program, you might want to consider consulting a PAD specialist

If you have any questions about PAD or would like to set up an appointment, MIMIT Health can be reached 24 hours a day, 7 days a week, at (708) 486-2600 or email info@mimithealth.com.

MIMIT Health "Living Your Best Life" Series - The Best Diabetes Blogs of 2019

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MIMIT Health provides world-class health care combined with minimally invasive treatments by industry-leading physicians and surgeons. Along with our best-in-class health care, we focus on our patients "living their best life" with healthy lifestyle strategies and wellness solutions.

Managing diabetes can be challenging. But connecting with people who are navigating the same condition can make all the difference.

In selecting this year’s best diabetes blogs, Healthline looked for ones that stood out for their informative, inspiring, and empowering content. We hope you find them helpful.

Read Complete List

If you have any questions or would like to set up an appointment, MIMIT Health can be reached 24 hours a day, 7 days a week, at (708) 486-2600 or email info@mimithealth.com.

Vitallina Preventive & Integrative Care partnered with MIMIT Health To Host FREE Weekend Varicose Vein Seminar

Dr. Rusalina Mincu of Vitallina Preventive & Integrative Care with Dr. Sameer Ahmed of MIMIT Health

Dr. Rusalina Mincu of Vitallina Preventive & Integrative Care with Dr. Sameer Ahmed of MIMIT Health

Vitallina Preventive & Integrative Care held a free educational varicose vein seminar over the weekend to talk about varicose veins and what you can do to make your legs look and feel better. The goal of these seminars are to educate people with vein issues and arm them with the knowledge to make good, informed decisions about their leg health.

If you missed the event, feel free contact Dr. Rusalina Mincu with questions or to set up an appointment at Vitallina Preventive & Integrative Care at 773-654-1082

Getting rid of varicose veins isn’t about vanity. It’s about your health and quality of life. Varicose veins are the result of venous insufficiency: blood that pools in the vein because of a faulty valve. They are a symptom of early stage venous disease, and, untreated, can lead to increased symptoms and worsening appearance.

Modern varicose vein treatments are outpatient procedures that are minimally invasive. But there are also things you can do on your own to alleviate discomfort and help prevent the progression of symptoms.

If you’ve already developed varicose veins, there are a number of ways to deal with them. MIMIT Health offers Minimally Invasive Treatments for Varicose Veins. If you have any questions or would like to set up an appointment, MIMIT Health can be reached 24 hours a day, 7 days a week, at (708) 486-2600 or email info@mimithealth.com.

Dr. Paramjit “Romi” Chopra talks with NBC News and Today.com About Varicose Veins

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As seen on:

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Varicose Veins:
Remedies and Treatment

Those bulging veins could lead to serious health issues.

April 8, 2019, 2:19 PM EDT / Source: TODAY

By Linda Carroll

If you’ve been covering up your legs because of unsightly knots of bluish veins, have hope: A simple procedure could help, according to an expert in treating varicose veins.

Of course, treating bulging veins isn’t just about vanity.

“People get upset when they see those veins,” said Dr. Paramjit “Romi” Chopra, founder and chairman of the Midwest Institute of Minimally Invasive Therapies, located near Chicago. But the unattractive appearance isn’t the worst problem with varicose veins, Chopra noted.

WHAT IS A VARICOSE VEIN?

The bulging veins can lead to blood clots that could eventually end up in in the lungs, a very dangerous condition, Chopra explained. They can also result in pain, swelling, leg fatigue and discoloration that eventually might turn into painful ulcers caused by blood leaking from the veins, he said.

WHAT CAUSES VARICOSE VEINS?

The cause of varicose veins, whether they are the large ropey variety or the thinner "spider" veins, is the same: malfunctioning valves. Think of the valves inside the veins as the locks in a canal. If a lock were to fail the water would flow backward leaving ships and barges stranded and the previous section of the canal flooded. A similar issue occurs when valves in the veins fail.

Veins are meant to bring blood back to the heart, Chopra explained. Your calves, as you walk or run, help push the blood in the veins up the leg past each valve. If the valve holds, then the blood moves up to the next vein segment with your next stride. But if the valve is faulty, the blood flows backwards building up pressure in the vein, eventually stretching out the blood vessel and sometimes allowing blood to leak into surrounding tissues. The hemoglobin in the leaking blood breaks down to a substance called hemosiderin.

“That acts like a tattoo discoloring the skin from the inside,” Chopra explained. Over time, painful skin ulcers can develop where the hemosiderin has accumulated.

WHY DO PEOPLE GET VARICOSE VEINS?

Not everyone develops varicose veins, Chopra said, adding that there are a number of risk factors:

  • Family history

  • Older age

  • Female gender

  • Obesity

  • Pregnancy

  • Occupation that requires a lot of standing

  • Smoking

  • Hypertension

  • Injury

While having a family history predisposes you to developing varicose veins, it doesn’t mean you’re destined to get them. Certain lifestyle changes may lower your risk, such as avoiding too much standing and developing an exercise program that allows your calves to do their work pumping blood up the legs, Chopra said. “You’ll never see a ballerina with varicose veins,” he added.

REMEDIES FOR VARICOSE VEINS:

If you’ve already developed varicose veins, there are a number of ways to deal with them. Your choice, at least in part, may depend on which one your insurance company is willing to pay for, Chopra noted.

MIMIT Health offers Minimally Invasive Treatments for Varicose Veins. If you have any questions or would like to set up an appointment, MIMIT Health can be reached 24 hours a day, 7 days a week, at (708) 486-2600 or email info@mimithealth.com.




Dr. Romi Chopra Speaks at The Outpatient Endovascular and Interventional Society's Sixth Annual National Scientific Meeting

Dr. Chopra’s presentation was on the Procedural, Economic & Patient Benefits of Radial Access

Dr. Chopra’s presentation was on the Procedural, Economic & Patient Benefits of Radial Access

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Dr. Romi Chopra presented on the Procedural, Economic & Patient Benefits of Radial Access at The OEIS 6th Annual National Scientific Meeting at the Vinoy Renaissance Resort & Golf Club, in St. Petersburg, Florida. The annual meeting features enlightening education sessions presented by some of the most knowledgeable speakers in their fields. The goal of OEIS is to serve and evolve the outpatient endovascular community through advocacy, education, promotion, development, and support.

The educational topics and themes are planned to address office-based interventional procedures and related research with a focus on innovations, evidence-based outcomes, assessment and interventions, continuous and legislative issues, practice management, patient safety, and environmental challenges.

OEIS is a patient centric society focused on ensuring quality healthcare for patients in all settings including the outpatient hospital and office based interventional suites. OEIS’s mission is to serve the public and the medical profession by improving the quality of healthcare through setting and adhering to these professional quality standards.

MIMIT Health is one of the fastest-growing independent multi-specialty physician groups in Illinois providing excellence in patient care, health care, research & medical education. 

MIMIT Health provides world class health care combined with minimally invasive treatments by industry-leading doctors, physicians and surgeons. Along with our best-in-class health care, we focus on our patients "living their best life" with healthy lifestyle strategies and wellness solutions.

If you have any questions or would like to set up an appointment, MIMIT Health can be reached 24 hours a day, 7 days a week, at (708) 486-2600 or email info@mimithealth.com.

April is Limb Loss Awareness Month - Amputation Doesn’t Have To Be The Only Outcome - MIMIT Health

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April is Limb Loss Awareness Month, a time to draw attention to the many people affected by limb loss and the reasons why amputations are performed.

People of all ages and from all walks of life lose limbs for a variety of reasons, and the number is growing. There are millions of people in the United States with amputations and The Amputee Coalition says that 60% of amputations are preventable.

Limb Loss Awareness Month helps bring attention to the growing number of those living with limb loss and to increase the understanding of amputation prevention. Approximately 2 million Americans currently live with limb loss and another 28 million are at risk for amputation. Limb loss is not uncommon and many may not be aware that it is largely due to disease (54%), and is preventable! Limb loss can affect people of all ages, ethnicities, and genders, but those at greatest risk are people who have diabetes or peripheral arterial disease (PAD).

Learn about peripheral artery disease
You may have friends or loved ones who mention that they have “poor circulation” and leg pain. Maybe they have wounds that won’t heal or they can’t sleep at night. But, they dismiss their health problems as just part of getting older. Or maybe you’re experiencing similar health problems yourself. The trouble is, health problems such as heavy, tired or painful legs and feet could point to something much worse than just getting older. You could be at risk for peripheral artery disease. Few people who have PAD know their options or even realize what PAD is. However, PAD is the biggest disease that most people have never heard about. It affects more than 18 million people – more than cancer, stroke and congestive heart failure**.  PAD isn’t something you can just shrug off. Early detection is important. If you think you might be at risk for the disease, consult a health care professional right away.

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Limb Loss Related to Vascular Disease
Peripheral arterial disease, also known as PAD, occurs when arteries become blocked and hardened by a buildup of plaque on the interior vessel walls decreasing blood flow to the legs and feet. As a result, the extremities do not receive the necessary amounts of oxygen and nutrients. If left untreated, PAD can lead to non-healing foot ulcers, wounds, and critical limb ischemia, all of which can lead to foot amputation.

Symptoms of PAD
Many people living with PAD do not experience any symptoms and are not aware that the disease is progressing. Those that do usually experience muscle cramping, leg pain or cold feet when walking that improves with rest. It’s possible that some people dismiss the symptoms as a normal part of the aging process.

The most common symptom of peripheral artery disease (PAD) in the lower extremities is a painful muscle cramping in the hips, thighs or calves when walking, climbing stairs or exercising.

The pain of PAD often goes away when you stop exercising, although this may take a few minutes. Working muscles need more blood flow. Resting muscles can get by with less.

If there's a blood-flow blockage due to plaque buildup, the muscles won't get enough blood during exercise to meet the needs. The "crampy" pain (called "intermittent claudication"), when caused by PAD, is the muscles' way of warning the body that it isn't receiving enough blood during exercise to meet the increased demand.

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Other symptoms of PAD include:

  • Leg pain that does not go away when you stop exercising

  • Foot or toe wounds that won't heal or heal very slowly

  • Gangrene, or dead tissue

  • A marked decrease in the temperature of your lower leg or foot particularly compared to the other leg or to the rest of your body

  • Poor nail growth on the toes or hair growth on the legs

  • Erectile dysfunction, especially in men with diabetes

The major risk factors for PAD are:

  • Smoking

  • Diabetes

  • Age

  • Kidney disease

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Be sure to find out if you are at risk for PAD and speak to a physician. Only a healthcare professional can diagnose PAD. When detected early, risk of amputation as a treatment option is lessened. Early detection can result in more PAD treatment options available, and may slow the progression of the disease. Initial treatment options for PAD could include lifestyle changes, prescription medications, or minimally invasive procedures to restore adequate blood flow to the limbs.

MIMIT Health offers Minimally Invasive Treatments for Peripheral Arterial Disease (PAD). If you have any questions or would like to set up an appointment, MIMIT Health can be reached 24 hours a day, 7 days a week, at (708) 486-2600 or email info@mimithealth.com.

Education is merely the first step towards taking action, not the last. If you or a loved one is at risk of amputation due to vascular disease such as PAD, help spread awareness and take preventive measures by getting screened or seeking treatment for symptoms.



** facts from https://standagainstamputation.com/peripheral-artery-disease/

Let’s Talk About Healthy Legs With Vitallina Preventive & Integrative Care & MIMIT Health

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Are you concerned about the way your varicose veins look? Or, more importantly, how they feel?

Getting rid of varicose veins isn’t about vanity. It’s about your health and quality of life. Varicose veins are the result of venous insufficiency: blood that pools in the vein because of a faulty valve. They are a symptom of early stage venous disease, and, untreated, can lead to increased symptoms and worsening appearance.

Modern varicose vein treatments are outpatient procedures that are minimally invasive. But there are also things you can do on your own to alleviate discomfort and help prevent the progression of symptoms.

At MIMIT Health, we believe that people with vein issues should have the knowledge to make good, informed decisions about their leg health. Come join us 2:00 pm on Saturday, April 13, to learn about varicose veins and what you can do to make your legs look and feel better.

This varicose vein seminar is free, but space is limited. Call 773-654-1082 to reserve your seat.


MIMIT Health offers Minimally Invasive Treatments for Varicose Veins. If you have any questions or would like to set up an appointment, Dr. Chopra and his associates can be reached 24 hours a day, 7 days a week, at (708) 486-2600 or email info@mimithealth.com.

Seasonal Allergies Are The Worst. Here's What You Need To Know For An Easier Spring

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This time of year in the western hemisphere is magical. You can feel nature coming alive, waking up from its long winter slumber. But as spring blossoms around us—as beautiful as it is—many of us also have seasonal allergies to worry about this time of year.

The FDA estimates that there are approximately 36 million people in the United States who suffer from seasonal allergies. Seasonal allergies are also sometimes called hay fever, or, by their technical (and very fancy) name, allergic rhinitis. It's important to know that allergic rhinitis technically takes two different forms:

Seasonal: This type of allergy is triggered by mold spores or pollens from grass, trees, and weeds, which happen more during changes of season.

Perennial: This type of allergy happens year round. It's generally caused by pet hair or dander, mold, dust mites, or cockroaches (gross, right?).

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Seasonal allergy symptoms.

Seasonal allergies can present in the form of a bunch of different symptoms—and many of them overlap with the common cold. Some common signs and symptoms to look out for include:

  • Sneezing

  • Runny nose

  • Stuffy nose due to blockage or congestion

  • Fatigue

  • Itchy eyes, mouth, nose, or throat

The root cause of seasonal allergies.

In order to really work toward overcoming seasonal allergies, we need to dive deeper into how the immune system works. Close to 80 percent of your immune system is located in your gut microbiome, and therefore, when your microbiome is weakened, so is your immune system. Many things can alter your gut health, including a poor diet, stress, and increased toxin exposure. This results in increased gut permeability—also known as leaky gut—inflammation, and an imbalance between good and bad bacteria.

Once again, it all comes back to gut health. In fact, in my clinic I have seen many patients' seasonal allergies start to alleviate as soon as they start healing their gut. The take-home here? Bad or worsening seasonal allergies might be why a patient comes to see me in the first place, but they rarely end up being the main issue once I start looking under the surface.

So now that we understand the root cause of seasonal allergies, we can narrow down tools to support both our gut and our immune system. In functional medicine, prevention is our main goal. We want to be proactive rather than reactive. So while certain over-the-counter allergy medications, prescription medications, and allergy shots can be helpful in some cases, we also want to focus on ways to fight allergies at the source—and hopefully eliminate the need to medicate (or stay indoors!) at all. These are my top remedies for both preventing and combating seasonal allergies so you can enjoy this season rather than dread it. There's no reason to stay indoors!

Read Entire Article: https://www.mindbodygreen.com/articles/seasonal-allergies-symptoms-causes-and-treatments


Dr. Paramjit "Romi" Chopra to speak at The Advanced Revascularization-Chapter XII (ARCH) Symposium

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The Advanced Revascularization-Chapter XII (ARCH) Symposium held in St. Louis is the nation’s premier interventional cardiology course specifically designed for the busy practicing physician and trainees. ARCH 2019 will focus on evidence based data, newer technological advances, case-based discussions, tips and tricks in complex cases, innovative therapeutic strategies that will enable physicians to treat their patients with high-risk and complex coronary, peripheral vascular and structural anatomy.

Attendees will learn from experts on the use of novel techniques and interventional tools, new CTO techniques, hemodynamic support during high-risk Coronary, Peripheral and Structural Interventions and decompensated heart failure, structural heart disease interventions and novel intravascular coronary anatomy/physiology techniques. In addition, use of newer adjunctive imaging modalities to optimize Coronary, Peripheral and Structural Interventions outcomes will be presented.

Participants will observe live cases and hear from International experts who will present their data and share their expertise. With a strong emphasis on participant-faculty interactions, attendees will learn the latest advances in interventional cardiology.

If you would like to attend this event, please register here

Lakers Star Brandon Ingram Out For Season After Discovery Of Deep Vein Thrombosis

(Photo by Steve Dykes/Getty Images)

(Photo by Steve Dykes/Getty Images)

Budding star Brandon Ingram, one of the lone bright spots for the Los Angeles Lakers this year, is reportedly done for the season. The Lakers say that doctors discovered a deep venous thrombosis in his shoulder.

Ingram has missed the last two games with a shoulder injury. According to the team, when doctors did further testing on the injury, they discovered the issue.

A deep vein thrombosis is a scary condition. It essentially means you have a blood clot in one of your body’s deep veins. The main risk is that it could travel to your lungs. read more

MIMIT Health offers Minimally Invasive Treatments for varicose veins and Deep Vein Thrombosis (DVT). If you have any questions or would like to set up an appointment, Dr. Chopra and his associates can be reached 24 hours a day, 7 days a week, at (708) 486-2600 or email info@mimithealth.com.


MIMIT Health, Interventional Cardiologists, Radiologists, and Vascular Surgeons Report Benefit in Use of Motorized C-arm

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Cardiac catheterization and angiography, in general, are still primary imaging modalities for the treatment of a variety of cardiovascular diseases. Technological advancements incorporated into fluoroscopic equipment have improved its design, mobility, imaging quality and efficiency. At Jackson Memorial Hospital in Miami, Florida, interventional cardiologist Cesar Mendoza, MD, FACC, stated that these were the qualities they were looking for when deciding to upgrade their equipment, and the Ziehm Vision RFD Hybrid Edition CMOSline flat panel motorized C-arm was the one that best fit their expectations.

“After having a bit more than 1 year of experience with a motorized C-arm, we are very satisfied with its performance. It has helped to streamline the daily cath lab patient flow, especially the one corresponding to our Heart Failure/Transplant service. Alleviating the caseload (20-25 cases per week) of this busy service in our hospital was a remarkable achievement,” said Dr. Mendoza. “Recognizing its value, we use this room for pre- and post-transplant right heart catheterizations, left heart catheterizations, coronary angiography, and myocardial biopsies. In addition, the electrophysiology team uses it for implantation of devices, and the interventional cardiology team for performing diagnostic and simple percutaneous coronary interventions.”

In this particular lab, the performance of more complex interventional procedures is limited by room size rather than by the capability of the Ziehm C-arm. Dr. Mendoza noted, “Imaging quality provided by Ziehm’s CMOS technology is as comparable as the one provided by the other fixed equipment available in our other rooms. Anecdotally, the first case done with the Ziehm C-arm was an emergent procedure performed in a patient with a large inferior ST-segment elevation myocardial infarction and cardiogenic shock. He required a complex intervention of the right coronary artery, including distal bifurcation stenting and hemodynamic support with an intra-aortic balloon pump. The motorized C-arm performed very well, demonstrating its capacity as a reliable backup when an emergency ensues. Its simplicity of use, optimal imaging quality, and versatility are encouraging features. From my own experience, I have no doubt of its real utility as a great asset for any cath lab.”

On the west coast of California, The Bay Area Vein and Vascular Center, an office-based laboratory (OBL) in Burlingame, recently replaced their older C-arm with the new motorized Ziehm Vision RFD 31 CMOSline and have been extremely pleased with its performance. The main advantages include exceptional image quality with reduced radiation for their patients, staff and interventionists. The C-arm is used mostly for lower extremity endovascular reconstruction, fistulagrams, placement and removal of tunneled catheter, ports and inferior vena cava (IVC) filters, deep venous reconstruction, and carotid and cerebral angiography. Dr. Raju Gandhi, Founder and Medical Director, Bay Area Vein and Vascular, stated, “The versatility of having the motorized C-arm along with a floating table has maximized our workflow during and between procedures. The level of efficiency is superior to the fixed units that we use at our hospitals. The support we have received from installation and maintenance over the past 6 years has been exemplary. We could not be more pleased with our recent acquisition and invite those who may be interested to visit our office-based laboratory.”

The doctors at Midwest Institute for Minimally Invasive Therapies (MIMIT) Health in Chicago, Illinois use the Ziehm Vision RFD C-arm in complicated arterial interventions in the lower extremities all the way down to the foot. The C-arm is also used in additional procedures such as transradial mesenteric procedures, spine procedures, and interventional oncology procedures. The Ziehm C-arm provides the capability to complete the entire gamut of procedures traditionally done in a hospital setting.

Dr. Paramjit “Romi” Chopra, Founder, President and CEO, stated that the Ziehm Vision RFD Hybrid Edition has helped increase their caseload and allows them to use the system the entire day due to its reliability and its water-cooled technology. Advanced Active Cooling (AAC) is a unique liquid cooling system that significantly boosts performance. AAC constantly maintains an ideal operational temperature, preventing the generator from overheating. “The Ziehm C-arm has also allowed us to become very efficient, as it’s well integrated into our network. It is a fixed lab on wheels and has definitely added value to our practice” said Dr. Chopra.

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Advantages of the Ziehm Vision RFD Hybrid Edition flat-panel detector include lowered dose, larger field of view, and a 30 x 30 flat-panel detector for excellent anatomical detail. High image resolution and sharp contrast allow the visualization of small vessels. The flat-panel square format extends the field of view offered by conventional image intensifiers, which enables significantly more information to be captured in each x-ray image.

“The workflow with the Ziehm C-arm has been excellent. For example, the vascular package is a one-button DSA and RSA, making it very simple to use. I can use it at the same time as performing a procedure and I can use it with tableside joystick controls, which is helpful. With the Ziehm Vision RFD Hybrid Edition, we have the same advantages as a fixed system, while being in a small outpatient or mobile lab. We have been able to accomplish everything we were able to do with a fixed system with the use of this unit,” said Dr. Chopra. 

What You Need to Know About Varicose Veins and Diabetes

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Diabetes does not cause varicose veins. However, studies show that diabetes and vein disease together can have a significant impact on your health.

Diabetes causes high blood sugar levels, which can lead to the weakening of the blood vessels. In turn, the venous system is more susceptible to infection. Because blood vessels and veins are prone to inflammation and weakness, there is an increased risk of circulatory issues for those diagnosed with diabetes, including an increased risk for infection.

Varicose veins usually are unsightly, large and rope-like. They often develop in the legs and can be seen from the surface of the skin. But varicose veins also can be deep within the tissues. Some varicose veins can take on the appearance of a red or blue-ish spider web. In addition to their appearance, varicose veins can cause pain, weakness, cramping and other uncomfortable symptoms.

Weight gain can be a result of diabetes and being overweight contributes to the development and advancement of varicose veins. The presence of varicose veins generally indicates inflammation, which places extra stress on the body’s immune and circulatory system. Advanced diabetes might even result in nerve and tissue damage in your legs, where varicose veins are most common.

Because both varicose veins and diabetes negatively impact circulation, the risk of developing life-threatening complications, such as deep vein thrombosis, rises. Another complication of varicose veins is the development of a skin ulcer. If a diabetic develops a skin ulcer due to an untreated varicose vein, the likelihood of a serious infection is higher.

Patients with diabetes and a predisposition to varicose veins should take extra care to reduce their risk as much as possible.

A healthy diet and regular exercise are important components in the treatment and maintenance of both diabetes and varicose veins.

Lifestyle tips for living with varicose veins and diabetes

  • Eat foods high in fiber

  • Avoid high sodium foods

  • Exercise regularly

  • Elevate your legs when at rest

  • Wear loose fitting clothes

  • Minimize sitting or standing for extended periods

Treatment options

Being a diabetic (Type I or Type II) should not prevent you from being treated for varicose veins.

If you are a diabetic, you need to be proactive when it comes to diagnosing and treating varicose veins. If you notice symptoms of varicose veins in your legs, you need to seek medical treatment as soon as possible. An experienced vein doctor will be able to evaluate your legs, diagnose vein disease and help you treat the problem effectively.

Patients living with diabetes shouldn’t ignore any venous irregularities. Inspect your legs and feet regularly. Be aware of changes in your body that might need medical attention.

A vein specialist can discuss with you a minimally invasive treatment to eliminate your varicose veins. Contemporary treatments are available for varicose veins to be treated quickly and successfully – allowing you to focus on living a healthy, active lifestyle.

MIMIT Health offers Minimally Invasive Treatments for varicose veins and Deep Vein Thrombosis (DVT). If you have any questions or would like to set up an appointment, Dr. Chopra and his associates can be reached 24 hours a day, 7 days a week, at (708) 486-2600 or email info@mimithealth.com.

MIMIT Health Helps to Create Awareness - March is National Deep-Vein Thrombosis Awareness Month | Video on how Blood Clots Form

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March is national Deep-Vein Thrombosis Awareness Month, a public health initiative aimed at raising awareness of this commonly occurring medical condition and its potentially fatal complication, pulmonary embolism. According to the American Heart Association, up to 2 million Americans are affected annually by DVT, more commonly known as blood clots. Yet, most Americans (74 percent) have little or no awareness of DVT, according to a national survey sponsored by the American Public Health Association.

Leading medical, public health and patient advocacy groups are sponsoring the observance and are working to increase awareness of the signs, symptoms and risk factors of DVT. All health professionals can help by learning more about the condition and the options available for treatment and prevention.

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About DVT

There are two types of veins: deep and superficial. Deep veins are large and surrounded by muscle in the center of a limb. DVT occurs when a thrombus (blood clot) forms in the deep vein, most often in the leg, resulting in partially or completely blocked circulation.

Symptoms of DVT can include swelling, pain, discoloration and abnormally hot skin at the affected area. Unfortunately, nearly half of DVT episodes have minimal, if any, symptoms. These “silent” afflictions are particularly worrisome. Adding to the complication, some conditions such as muscle strain, skin inflection, phlebitis – inflammation of veins – have similar symptoms, making DVT harder to diagnose. The most accurate ways to diagnose DVT are through venous ultrasound, venography and Impedance plethysmography – detection via electrodes and blood pressure cuff placed on the patient’s calf and thigh.

While DVT below the knee is unlikely to cause serious complications, clots above the knee can break off and travel up the bloodstream, resulting in a blocked blood vessel in the lung (pulmonary embolism). Other consequences are damaged blood vessels leading to blood pooling, swelling and pain in the leg, and in the most severe cases with large clots, death.

Certain individuals are more at risk for deep-vein thrombosis than others. Those with prior DVT, obesity, stroke, pregnancy, undergoing major surgery, over the age of 65 and those who are confined to long periods of immobility via travel or bed rest are more likely to be afflicted. According to the American Medical Association, approximately 2 million people suffer from DVT each year, more than the annual amount affected by heart attack or stroke.

MIMIT Health offers Minimally Invasive Treatments for Deep Vein Thrombosis (DVT). If you have any questions or would like to set up an appointment, Dr. Chopra and his associates can be reached 24 hours a day, 7 days a week, at (708) 486-2600 or email info@mimithealth.com.

SAVE THE DATE! Dr. Paramjit "Romi" Chopra to speak at The Advanced Revascularization-Chapter XII (ARCH) Symposium

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The Advanced Revascularization-Chapter XII (ARCH) Symposium held in St. Louis is the nation’s premier interventional cardiology course specifically designed for the busy practicing physician and trainees. ARCH 2019 will focus on evidence based data, newer technological advances, case-based discussions, tips and tricks in complex cases, innovative therapeutic strategies that will enable physicians to treat their patients with high-risk and complex coronary, peripheral vascular and structural anatomy.

Attendees will learn from experts on the use of novel techniques and interventional tools, new CTO techniques, hemodynamic support during high-risk Coronary, Peripheral and Structural Interventions and decompensated heart failure, structural heart disease interventions and novel intravascular coronary anatomy/physiology techniques. In addition, use of newer adjunctive imaging modalities to optimize Coronary, Peripheral and Structural Interventions outcomes will be presented.

Participants will observe live cases and hear from International experts who will present their data and share their expertise. With a strong emphasis on participant-faculty interactions, attendees will learn the latest advances in interventional cardiology.

If you would like to attend this event, please register here