MIMIT Health | Better Patient Outcomes Start in the Cloud

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Better patient outcomes start in the cloud

MIMIT's executive team: Paramjit "Romi" Chopra (center), Manish Goomar (left), and Puneet Chowdhary (right), takes #boxworks by storm.

When every second counts, digital business processes give healthcare teams the data we need at the point of care. But you can’t just flip a switch and become a digital organization. You need to transform the way you work. That’s where MIMIT Health and Cloud Content Management comes in. With Box, MIMIT Health gets a single place to collaborate, manage and secure all content and processes — while maintaining compliance and adherence to industry standards like HIPAA.

And by integrating seamlessly with the apps already implemented, Box provides a single, secure content layer to power the digital workplace.

That's why 95,000 customers and 69% of the Fortune 500 rely on Box to meet the demands of the digital age.

Dr. Paramjit "Romi" Chopra presenting at #boxworks19 in San Francisco on data storage and security in the cloud.

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Paramjit "Romi" Chopra presenting at #boxworks19 in San Francisco on data storage and security in the cloud.

Dr. Chopra was part of an all-star lineup of speakers for the ninth annual event, including Ginni Rometty, IBM CEO and President, Abby Wambach, American Soccer Icon and Activist for Equality and Inclusion, and Ryan Coogler, award-winning writer and director of Black Panther and Creed!

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MIMIT Journal | PAD Patients Have a 6-7 Times Greater Risk of Coronary Artery Disease, Heart Attack & Stroke

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As Peripheral Artery Disease (PAD) Awareness Month comes to a close, we want to make sure you know what PAD is and how to lower your risk of developing PAD. Take a look at this infographic, and if you think you are at risk or have any of the symptoms, call us at (708) 486-2600 to schedule a screening to see how we can help you!

MIMIT Health Journal | Symptoms of Peripheral Artery Disease (PAD)

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You’re getting older, and you’re noticing some changes in your health. Don’t ignore the signs or brush them off as “normal”. It might be more than just age catching up to you – it might be peripheral artery disease (PAD).

PAD causes narrowed, hardened arteries in the legs, limiting blood flow to the legs and feet. PAD leads to a range of general symptoms – some of which can be hard to recognize as a sign of a more serious health issue. Many people just deal with the symptoms as a sign of aging, or they think it’s part of another health issue they have, such as heart problems.

Symptoms

While many people with peripheral artery disease have mild or no symptoms, some people have leg pain when walking (claudication).

Claudication symptoms include muscle pain or cramping in your legs or arms that's triggered by activity, such as walking but disappears after a few minutes of rest. The location of the pain depends on the location of the clogged or narrowed artery. Calf pain is the most common location.

The severity of claudication varies widely, from mild discomfort to debilitating pain. Severe claudication can make it hard for you to walk or do other types of physical activity.

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Peripheral artery disease signs and symptoms include:

  • Painful cramping in one or both of your hips, thighs or calf muscles after certain activities, such as walking or climbing stairs (claudication)

  • Leg numbness or weakness

  • Coldness in your lower leg or foot, especially when compared with the other side

  • Sores on your toes, feet or legs that won't heal

  • A change in the color of your legs

  • Hair loss or slower hair growth on your feet and legs

  • Slower growth of your toenails

  • Shiny skin on your legs

  • No pulse or a weak pulse in your legs or feet

  • Erectile dysfunction in men

If peripheral artery disease progresses, pain may even occur when you're at rest or when you're lying down (ischemic rest pain). It may be intense enough to disrupt sleep. Hanging your legs over the edge of your bed or walking around your room may temporarily relieve the pain.

When to see a doctor

If you have leg pain, numbness or other symptoms, don't dismiss them as a normal part of aging. Call to schedule a complimentary consultation at any of our locations today at (708) 486-2600 or https://www.mimithealth.com/contact-form

But there is good news

PAD symptoms are often treatable. Early detection is important, and treatment under the guidance of a PAD specialist can lead to relief and may prevent the progression of the disease.

If you’re experiencing any of the symptoms of PAD or have risk factors for the disease (increasing age, diabetes mellitus, kidney disease, hypertension, smoking), then schedule a complimentary consultation at any of our locations today at (708) 486-2600 or https://www.mimithealth.com/contact-form

Each Year There Are More Than 160,000 Amputations Performed As A Result Of Peripheral Arterial Disease (Commonly Called PAD).

 
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MIMIT Health | We are Peripheral Artery Disease (PAD) Specialists

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Each year 160,000 - 180,000 Americans undergo amputation of a limb as a result of complications associated with peripheral artery disease (PAD).

A staggering 18 million Americans suffer from this potentially life-threatening disease where plaque, like calcium, builds up along blood vessel walls, narrowing the arteries and reducing blood flow to the legs and feet.

Of those suffering from PAD, up to 3.5 million have progressed to critical limb ischemia (CLI), the most severe and deadly form of PAD, where the blood vessels become dangerously narrow, leading to rest pain, ulcers, and gangrene. If left untreated many of these cases will lead to major amputation.

CLI is a very complex disease. It takes a dedicated group of health care professionals, including wound care specialists, infectious disease specialists, podiatry, and vascular specialists working co-operatively to treat all facets of this debilitating disease.

The risk for developing PAD rises with age and is highest for those over 50 years old. Smoking, the single greatest risk factor, increases the chance of developing PAD three to five times. But other common risk factors include diabetes, high blood pressure, abnormal cholesterol levels, and heart disease. And symptoms of PAD can often be overlooked by those suffering from the disease, which may allow the disease to progress to a more severe state before it is diagnosed. The most common symptoms are leg pain, leg muscle fatigue, coldness or numbness in the lower legs and feet or leg cramps.

MIMIT Health is committed to providing the most advanced treatment options in a dedicated focus to saving limbs and saving lives.

Schedule a complimentary consultation at any of our locations today at (708) 486-2600 or schedule online

September is Peripheral Artery Disease (PAD) Awareness Month!

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September is Peripheral Artery Disease (PAD) Awareness Month! PAD is a chronic circulatory condition, which if left untreated can result in unnecessary limb amputations. PAD affects nearly 20 million Americans, and an estimated 200,000 of them – disproportionately from minorities communities – suffer avoidable amputations every year.

By increasing PAD awareness nationally, MIMIT Health hopes to improve access to PAD screening and treatments, which is shown to improve quality of life, reduce care costs and prevent limb loss.

Tools And Resources

During September, we encourage members of the vascular care community including physicians, clinicians and patient advocates to use the tools below to spread the word about PAD Awareness Month among their colleagues, patients and friends. Together, we can increase understanding of vascular disease to improve the health of many Americans.

By increasing PAD awareness nationally, we hope to improve access to PAD screening and treatments, which is shown to improve quality of life, reduce care costs and prevent limb loss.

Schedule a complimentary consultation at any of our locations today at (708) 486-2600 or schedule online at: https://www.mimithealth.com/contact-form

MIMIT Health Journal | You Don’t Need a Lot of Time or Money to Make Self-Care a Priority

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Self-care is about forming healthy habits, not simply “improving” or “treating” yourself.

Research shows many people misunderstand what effective self-care is and how they can best benefit from it.

A recent Harris Poll reported that self-care isn’t a priority for consumers because 44 percent believe self-care is only possible for people with enough time.

About 35 percent believe self-care is only possible for those with enough money.

Incorporating healthy self-care practices into daily life can have lasting benefits. These don’t need to be expensive or time-consuming to be effective.

Self-care is a term thrown around a lot, but experts say it’s often misunderstood.

Read Entire Article Here

If you have any questions or would like to set up an appointment, MIMIT Health can be reached 24 hours a day, 7 days a week, at (708) 486-2600 or email info@mimithealth.com

Dr. Paramjit “Romi” Chopra meets U.S. Olympian (Bobsled), Johnny Quinn at Sudden Cardiac-Death Awareness Research Foundation’s Annual Gala

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Dr. Paramjit “Romi” Chopra meets U.S. Olympian (Bobsled), Author (PUSH Through the Barriers) and former pro football player Johnny Quinn at Sudden Cardiac-Death Awareness Research Foundation’s Annual Gala to help a great cause.

Learn more about Johnny Quinn here

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Sudden Cardiac-Death Awareness Research Foundation

Midwestern Career College Hosts Local Employers Including MIMIT Health for Summer 2019 Career Fair

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Come visit us at Midwestern Career College’s Job Fair this Wednesday, July 31st from 12-3PM at 100 S Wacker Dr. We will be there to meet passionate job seekers and to answer questions about all things MIMIT Health!

We are in search of qualified candidates for: Nurse Practitioner, Patient Engagement/Scheduler, Operating Room Technician, PA, Financial Analyst, Care Coordinator. We look forward to seeing you there!

Health clinics, hospitals, staffing agencies, and several other healthcare providers will gather at Midwestern Career College’s main campus at 100 South Wacker Drive in Chicago for the Summer 2019 Career Fair on Wednesday, July 31 from 12:00PM to 3:00PM.

Current students and alumni are encouraged to dress professionally, bring multiple copies of their resume, and meet with potential employers face-to-face to learn more about getting hired in their field of work. Intended to prepare current students and alumni for the job hunt, the career fair will host employers from all over the Chicagoland area. Additionally, the event will open with a speaker from ResCare who will provide a presentation on interviewing tips.

To register, go here: https://mccollege.edu/mcc-to-host-career-fair-on-may-30/

MIMIT Health - 9 Facts About Fibroids Every Woman Should Know

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Raise your hand if you know anything about uterine fibroids. Bueller? Bueller? While uterine fibroids aren’t standard info covered in Women’s Bodies 101, they should be: Up to 70 percent of all women are likely to get them in their lifetime. Here are all the nitty-gritty details you need to know: 

1. Uterine Fibroids Are Super-Common

Also known as leiomyomas or myomas, these are the most common uterine tumors. One study found that between 70 to 80 percent of all women will get them by the age of 50. You’re most likely to see them in your 40s and early 50s.

2. Fibroids Aren’t Cancer

Fibroids are benign, non-cancerous tumors—but uterine fibroids can have similar symptoms to a rare form of cancer called uterine sarcoma. Unfortunately, scientists don’t have a reliable way to detect sarcoma—except when they are doing surgery to remove fibroids. If you’ve got fibroids, you’ll want to discuss the risk of uterine sarcoma with your doc.

3. African-American Women Are More Likely to Get Fibroids

They’re two to three times more likely, in fact. These fibroids also typically develop at a younger age, grow larger, and cause more severe symptoms. You may also have an increased risk of fibroids if you have never been pregnant, are severely overweight, or have a family member who has fibroids.

4. Many Women Have No Symptoms and Require No Treatment

Good news! Fibroids only require treatment if they are causing you symptoms—and most women with fibroids are symptom-free. “If a woman with fibroids has no related symptoms, it may be unnecessary to recommend treatment beyond clinical observation over time, as long as the small risk of hidden sarcoma is discussed,” says Antonio Pizarro, M.D., board-certified doctor in obstetrics and gynecology, female pelvic medicine, and reconstructive surgery.

5. They Are the Leading Cause of Hysterectomies

More than 200,000 hysterectomies—the surgical removal of the uterus—are performed each year for uterine fibroids in the United States. Along with making you infertile, the procedure also carries its own risks, so doctors only recommend it when the fibroids are extremely painful or have not responded to other methods.

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6. But a Hysterectomy Isn’t the Only Option Anymore

There are now a number of medical therapies that can be used to shrink or slow the growth of fibroids, including hormone treatments, ultrasound therapy, or a myomectomy, which removes the fibroids while leaving the uterus in tact. If the fibroids don’t require removal, there are other treatments that can help you deal with symptoms such as ibuprofen, birth control pills, or ablation (a procedure using radiofrequency energy to destroy tissue).

7. The Most Common Symptom Is a Heavy Menstrual Flow

Like, really heavy—maybe even with blood clots. Fibroids can also cause bleeding between periods, the need to pee, pelvic cramping, a bloated abdomen, or painful sex.

8. You Can Still Get Pregnant—but May Have Difficulties

Most women with fibroids have issue-free pregnancies, but they can cause some complications. Some research suggests that certain types of uterine fibroids can change the size and shape of the uterus, which can impact a woman’s ability to get pregnant—though experts estimate fibroids cause only one to two percent of infertility cases. Fibroids are also linked to a six-time greater risk of needing to deliver via cesarean section and a risk of heavier bleeding after delivery.

9. Scientists Still Don’t Know What Causes Them

“The precise cause of the mutations that cause fibroids is unsettled, despite their very high prevalence and clinical impact,” says Pizarro. Current research leans towards the impact of hormones such as estrogen and progesterone, since tumors rarely appear before a women’s first period and decrease after menopause. Stress, diet, and environmental factors may also play a role in fibroid development.

If you have any questions about Uterine Fibroids, MIMIT Health can be reached 24 hours a day, 7 days a week, at (708) 486-2600 or email info@mimithealth.com

#Uterinefibroids #UFE #fibroids #mimithealth #chicagodoctor #topdoc#minimallyinvasivetreatments #minimallyinvasivetherapies

Fast Facts You Should Know About Uterine Fibroids from MIMIT Health

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This article is part of our Uterine Fibroid Awareness Campaign during the Month July. Stay tuned for regular articles and posts regarding Uterine Fibroids and Women's health.

What are Uterine Fibroids?

Fibroids are muscular tumors that grow in the wall of the uterus (womb). Another medical term for fibroids is leiomyoma or just "myoma". Fibroids are almost always benign (not cancerous). Fibroids can grow as a single tumor, or there can be many of them in the uterus. They can be as small as an apple seed or as big as a grapefruit. In unusual cases they can become very large.

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What are the symptoms of Fibroids?:

  • Heavy bleeding (which can be heavy enough to cause anemia) or painful periods

  • Feeling of fullness in the pelvic area (lower stomach area)

  • Enlargement of the lower abdomen

  • Frequent urination

  • Pain during sex

  • Lower back pain

  • Complications during pregnancy and labor, including a six-time greater risk of cesarean section

  • Reproductive problems, such as infertility, which is very rare

Who gets Fibroids?

  • ·Age. Fibroids become more common as women age, especially during the 30s and 40s through menopause. After menopause, fibroids usually shrink.

  • Family history. Having a family member with fibroids increases your risk. If a woman's mother had fibroids, her risk of having them is about three times higher than average.

  • Ethnic origin. African-American women are more likely to develop fibroids than white women.

  • Obesity. Women who are overweight are at higher risk for fibroids. For very heavy women, the risk is two to three times greater than average.

  • ·Eating habits. Eating a lot of red meat (e.g., beef) and ham is linked with a higher risk of fibroids. Eating plenty of green vegetables seems to protect women from developing fibroids.

How are Fibroids Treated?

Most women with fibroids do not have any symptoms. For women who do have symptoms, there are treatments that can help. Talk with your doctor about the best way to treat your fibroids. You doctor will consider many things before helping you choose a treatment. Some of these things include:

  • Whether or not you are having symptoms from the fibroids

  • If you might want to become pregnant in the future

  • The size of the fibroids

  • The location of the fibroids

  • Your age and how close to menopause you might be

If you have fibroids but do not have any symptoms, you may not need treatment. Your doctor will check during your regular exams to see if they have grown.

If you have any questions about Uterine Fibroids, our minimally invasive therapies or would like to refer a patient, MIMIT Health can be reached 24 hours a day, 7 days a week, at (708) 486-2600 or email info@mimithealth.com

 

Woman Struggling With Uterine Fibroids Reveals How It Has Affected Her Quality of Life

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After years of padding herself so she wouldn't bleed on her clothes and dealing with debilitating period pain, Tanika Gray Valbrun launched a campaign to educate others about the toll fibroids can take.

Tanika Gray Valbrun rarely stands up without looking down to make sure she hasn’t bled onto her seat. She checks before leaving staff meetings at CNN, where she works as a news producer. She checks when she steps out of her car. And before she married her husband, she would check repeatedly during dates.

“I’ve had to learn how to pad myself” to keep the bleeding contained, she says. “I know the whole formula—what kind of underwear to wear, what kind of tights, what kind of Spanx. I’ve tried and tested everything. It’s become a way of life.”

For Valbrun, 41, it’s life with uterine fibroids.

Throughout the 25 years Valbrun has lived with the benign tumors, they have caused menstrual bleeding so heavy, she’s become severely anemic at times, requiring emergency blood transfusions. She’s endured excruciating cramps for nearly a third of every month. She’s undergone two surgeries to remove them. And until recently, she gave up on wearing white.

“It’s a simple thing,” she says. “Like, who cares, why not just wear black? But I love clothes, and the fact that I had to sacrifice wearing white for these benign tumors—I wasn’t feeling it.”

Facts about fibroids

After decades of being downplayed and pushed to the sidelines, women’s reproductive health has in recent years become the subject of louder public conversation. Periods are now openly celebrated in books and a board game, hit TV shows, and an Oscar-winning short film. Thanks to vocal celebrities like Lena Dunham and Padma Lakshmi, many chronic pelvic conditions—endometriosis high among them—have seen splashy media coverage.

But fibroids haven’t yet had their big cultural moment, despite a growing chorus of personalities from Sara Bareilles to FKA twigs to several Real Housewives sharing their experiences. Doctors say the condition isn’t on most people’s radars—but they’re hopeful this will change.

“Women need to know what fibroids are and what fibroid symptoms are,” says Elizabeth Stewart, MD, a gynecologic surgeon at the Mayo Clinic who specializes in the condition, which costs the US healthcare system some $34 billion annually. The more education women receive, the more likely they’ll get the support and treatment they need.

Fibroids are extremely prevalent: Roughly 70% of white women and 80% of black women will develop them in their lifetime. In most cases, the growths are innocuous: Less than half of women with fibroids will suffer any symptoms or consequences. But when they do act up, they can become a bloody, bulky barrier to women’s well-being and happiness.

“There is a trauma in having to constantly worry about what’s going to happen when you go out,” says Valbrun. “You can never be carefree.”

Though heavy bleeding is one common symptom of fibroids, not all women who have fibroids experience it. Depending on their size, number, and location in and around a woman’s uterus, fibroids can also cause bloating, pressure on the bladder or bowel that can sometimes affect the organs’ ability to function, and pain during sex. In some cases, they can impact a woman’s ability to become or stay pregnant—but, Dr. Stewart stresses, “many women with fibroids conceive without difficulty and have an uncomplicated pregnancy.”

Historically, the most common treatment for problematic fibroids has been to remove the uterus entirely—fibroids are the leading cause of hysterectomy in this country. But many doctors now offer an expanding list of options, from hormone therapy and sound waves to minimally invasive surgery.

New research suggests a treatment called uterine fibroid embolization, in which a doctor injects small particles into the uterine arteries to block the fibroid blood vessels, causing them to shrink and “die,” may be just as effective as surgery and lead to fewer complications. Read More

If you have any questions about Uterine Fibroids, our minimally invasive therapies or would like to refer a patient, MIMIT Health can be reached 24 hours a day, 7 days a week, at (708) 486-2600 or email info@mimithealth.com

MIMIT Health Partners with Salesforce to Provide Patients World-Class Healthcare

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MIMIT Health met with the Salesforce Ignite team to discuss strategic planning using the V2MOM model developed by Salesforce, and discussed leveraging technology that allows precision and agility enabling transformational change. Other topics of discussion were focused on improving and optimizing operational efficiency via the Health Cloud, maximizing technology to improve patient outcomes, and future business development.

“My sincere gratitude to Salesforce as an organization for being such an amazing and valuable strategic partner. The assistance and advice you provided as we implement V2MOM at MIMIT Health are priceless. Your engagement and strategic advice were invaluable and inspirational.” Said MIMIT Health CEO and Founder, Dr. Paramjit “Romi” Chopra.

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“As an innovative, transformative health care organization, we are overjoyed and excited to have Salesforce as our core platform and its ecosystem with super effective solutions.” Dr. Chopra added

Salesforce Ignite is a specialized program that helps fast-growing companies like MIMIT Health better engage customers, employees, and stakeholders with connected experiences. The focused discussions between MIMIT Health and Salesforce help to build digital dexterity by finding solutions that work within existing environments.

MIMIT Health is always looking to improve existing processes and learn new strategies to foster innovation and promote positive change leveraging the Salesforce ecosystem that turns ideas into reality.

MIMIT Health provides world class health care combined with minimally invasive treatments by industry-leading physicians and surgeons. Along with our best-in-class health care, we focus on our patients "living their best life" with healthy lifestyle strategies and wellness solutions.

If you have any questions about minimally invasive surgeries or would like to refer a patient, MIMIT Health can be reached 24 hours a day, 7 days a week, at (708) 486-2600 or email info@mimithealth.com 

Today is Global Running Day | MIMIT Health Encourages Everyone to Get Moving

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Fitness is one of the best predictors of survival and longevity in people both with and without heart disease. #GlobalRunningDay

What is Global Running Day?

Global Running Day is a worldwide celebration of running that encourages everyone to get moving. It doesn’t matter how fast you run or how far you go—what’s important is that you take part, and how you do it is up to you. Run a lap around your block, take your dog for a long walk, or call your friends for a pick-up game in the park. The important thing is that you have fun being active—and you inspire others to join you.


If exercise is one of the best things you can do for your heart and your body, then inactivity has the opposite effect.

“If you want to age the equivalent of 30 years go home, get in bed for three weeks and get up maybe for meals or bathroom breaks, that’s it,” says Dr. Barry Franklin, director of preventive cardiology and cardiac rehabilitation at Beaumont.

Exercise has positive effects on more than just your muscle tone - though that brings benefits beyond simple vanity, too. It can help you prevent heart disease and lower the risk of chronic diseases like diabetes. Regular exercise also:

  • reduces body weight and fat stores

  • lowers blood pressure

  • improves the body’s ability to handle blood sugar

Dr. Franklin says researchers at Beaumont have found that fitness is one of the best predictors of survival and longevity in people both with and without heart disease.

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MORE THAN ONE KIND OF EXERCISE

Broadly speaking, there are two major categories of exercise: aerobic or endurance exercise, defined as large-muscle rhythmic exercises like walking, running or cycling; and weight or strength training. The latter is especially valuable for middle-aged or older people.

“The reason I say that is that as we get older, what happens is we tend to lose lean body mass, muscle mass, and we tend to gain fat mass,” Dr. Franklin says. “The scale weight may not change all that much, but it’s very misleading.

“What resistance training can do is maintain or increase lean body mass as we age, which also tends to burn more calories. So that’s very important.”

Also important for people as they age: stretching exercises, like yoga or tai chi. If done regularly, they can help prevent falls and injury, Dr. Franklin says.

SMALL INCREMENTS WORK JUST AS WELL

When it comes to exercising, the official guidelines from the American Heart Association call for 150 minutes a week of moderate exercise or 75 minutes per week of vigorous exercise - or 30 minutes a day for five days a week.

But if you’re worried that it’s too hard to carve out that much time in a single block, don’t be. Studies now show that you can do three, 10-minute bouts of aerobic exercise “and get the same or better benefits as if you do one, 30-minute bout,” Dr. Franklin says. That’s because every time you exercise, your metabolism goes up and stays elevated for as much as 90 minutes, burning more calories than normal even after you’ve stopped exercising.

“You don’t have to put the dollar in the piggy bank all at one time,” Dr. Franklin says. “I tell patients, ‘You can put four quarters in there at different times and get the same or more benefit.’”

WHICH EXERCISES ARE BEST, AND WHICH SHOULD YOU AVOID?

While running, cycling, dancing and swimming are all great ways to get your heart rate up, scientists widely consider a vigorous walk to be great for your heart. And as Dr. Franklin notes, even taking regular breaks from your desk to walk around the office or visit a coworker you need to speak with can add up to big health benefits.

But if you haven’t exercised in years, don’t go out and immediately start running. “I don’t care if you were a former athlete, start walking,” Dr. Franklin says. Then gradually increase your speed to start short bursts of jogging.

Another dangerous activity is shoveling snow which Dr. Franklin says is “probably the most hazardous activity available today.” In 2003, Beaumont researchers published the results of a study in the American Journal of Cardiology after two major snowfalls in the Detroit region in which 36 people dropped dead after shoveling snow.

It’s dangerous for several reasons, Dr. Franklin says. First, it involves arm work, which is more taxing than leg work. Secondly, people tend to strain when hoisting big shovelfuls of snow and hold their breath, which can cause big fluctuations in heart rate and blood pressure. Thirdly, the cold wind tends to constrict blood vessels and arteries to the heart, so oxygenated blood tends to pool to the lower extremities instead of to the heart and head, where it’s most needed.

MIMIT Health provides world class health care combined with minimally invasive treatments by industry-leading physicians and surgeons. Along with our best-in-class health care, we focus on our patients "living their best life" with healthy lifestyle strategies and wellness solutions.

If you have any questions about minimally invasive surgeries or would like to refer a patient, MIMIT Health can be reached 24 hours a day, 7 days a week, at (708) 486-2600 or email info@mimithealth.com 


June Is Men's Health Month | Men's Health Week June 10-16 Celebrates its 25th Anniversary

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This June, families and communities around the nation are bringing men’s health to the forefront with the kick-off of the 2019 Men’s Health Month, an annual awareness period solely dedicated to education and activities on the health and wellness of men and boys. This year also marks the 25th year of National Men’s Health Week (NMHW), a special awareness period recognized by Congress. Men’s Health Month is built on the pillars of AWARENESS – PREVENTION – EDUCATION – FAMILY.

This year, Men’s Health Week will be celebrated on June 10-16, ending on Father’s Day. The week is celebrated as International Men’s Health Week around the globe. During this time, health care professionals, private corporations, faith-based community organizations, and government agencies, plan activities that focus on the health and well-being of boys, men, and their families. 

“Men continue to lag behind women in health outcomes while leading the top causes of death in the U.S., which is why an awareness period like Men’s Health Month is critical for men, boys, and communities to be more engaged in their health,” said Ana Fadich-Tomsic, VP of Men’s Health Network (MHN). “Consequently, more health dangers loom for men who continue to suffer from the lack of access to mental health services and the impact of the ongoing opioid crisis. Now, more than ever, support is needed from policymakers, state and federal legislators, the media, and our private and non-profit partners to help fight these systemic issues and save lives.”

Over 350 mayors and governors across the country have recognized June as Men's Health Month with official proclamations. These proclamations are displayed in Congress. Report cards on the status of the health and well-being of boys and men in each state are available at the State of Men’s Health web site. Free resources and toolkits are available in both English and Spanish at www.MensHealthMonth.com

“Although we continue to make progress in raising awareness about the importance of overall preventative health screenings, in addition to self-care, mental health, and the ongoing opioid epidemic, many men and women are still neglecting their own health care needs,” said Beth Battaglino, RN, CEO, HealthyWomen. “We share in the goal of Men’s Health Month to raise awareness, educate, provide resources and remove any stigmas that are associated with these important health topics that affect so many men and young boys.”

Men still face challenges in health outcomes that extend beyond their physical wellness. This year, men and boys continue to suffer a “silent crisis” in accessing mental health services. Men are more likely to commit suicide and suffer from depression. Additionally, the ongoing opioid crisis has also hit men hard as they are more than twice as likely to die from opioid use than women, according to the Kaiser Family Foundation.

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“Men are significantly impacted by the opioid crisis. In 2017, 68 percent of Americans who died from opioid overdoses were men (CDC),” said Holly Jespersen, Senior Communications Manager of Shatterproof. “Shatterproof is committed to Men’s Health Month and continues to work towards ending the unjust stigma of addiction and ensuring treatment based on science is available to all who need it."

"The Partnership for Safe Medicines is proud to support awareness around Men's Health Month. Too many men in America have been victimized by the counterfeit pill crisis that has currently spread to 48 states and killed people in over 30 states," said PSM Executive Director Shabbir Imber Safdar. "We are hopeful that our efforts will result in more men learning about the dangers of counterfeits and fake online pharmacies and engaging in safer behavior.”

A key part of the continued momentum is the annual event and social media campaign, including:

• SaludTues & Men’s Health Network Twitter Chat: “Men’s Health Month” and other partners 1:00 p.m. EDT on June 18

• The “Men & the Opioid Crisis” Twitter Chat with Men’s Health Network and partners is scheduled for June 26 at 2 PM EST

• Congress joins the celebration with a Congressional Workout, planned for June 5.

• #ShowUsYourBlue campaign: People all over the world take pictures of themselves and others wearing blue to increase awareness for men’s health and posting the photos on social media with the #ShowUsYourBlue hashtag 

• June 14 is Wear Blue Friday, the #ShowUsYourBlue social media storm where individuals are encouraged to take selfies of themselves wearing blue during the day and post to social media using the hashtag

MIMIT Health provides world class health care combined with minimally invasive treatments by industry-leading physicians and surgeons. Along with our best-in-class health care, we focus on our patients "living their best life" with healthy lifestyle strategies and wellness solutions.

If you have any questions about minimally invasive surgeries or would like to refer a patient, MIMIT Health can be reached 24 hours a day, 7 days a week, at (708) 486-2600 or email info@mimithealth.com 


Men’s Health Month and Men’s Health Week are sponsored by Men’s Health Network (MHN), which maintains a list of experts and spokespersons on all areas of male health and wellness, including fatherhood issues. Men’s Health Month supporters include Sanofi-Regeneron, Genomic Health, and Pfizer, Inc.

What are Minimally Invasive Procedures? | MIMIT Health

Minimally invasive procedures allow your physician to use techniques that limit the size and number of cuts, or incisions, that they need to make. It’s typically considered safer than open surgery. You’ll usually recover more quickly, spend less time in the hospital, and feel more comfortable while you heal.

In traditional open surgery, your surgeon makes one large cut to see the part of your body that they’re operating on. In minimally invasive surgery, your surgeon uses small tools, cameras, and lights that fit through several tiny cuts in your skin. This allows your surgeon to perform surgery without opening a lot of skin and muscle.

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Some minimally invasive procedures are done with robotic technology that allows more precise control over the surgery. Other minimally invasive surgeries are done without robotic assistance.

Minimally Invasive Procedures we offer:

Angiography
This means taking an x-ray while injecting dye to study blood flow in the arteries. The resulting image can be used to examine almost any artery within the body. Often, less-invasive tests, such as magnetic resonance angiography and CT angiography, are used as well.

Carotid angiography/stents
Using imaging for guidance, the physician threads a catheter to the carotid artery, then inflates a balloon to open the blood vessel where it is narrowed or blocked. In some cases, this is then held open with a stent, a tiny metal mesh cylinder.

Angioplasty/stents
In some cases of peripheral artery disease, your physician may recommend angioplasty and stenting. This procedure is considered minimally invasive in comparison to open surgery. It is most effective for more localized blockages in the larger arteries. The physician threads a thin tube through a blood vessel in the arm or groin up to the involved site in the artery. The tube has a tiny balloon on the end. When the tube is in place, the physician inflates the balloon to push the plaque outward against the wall of the artery. This widens the artery and restores blood flow.

Phlebectomy
This is a method of removing varicose veins on the surface of the legs. It is done in the office under local anesthesia. It involves making tiny punctures or incisions through which the veins are removed. The incisions are so small no stitches are required and the patient is able to walk the next day.

Radiofrequency Ablation
This involves inserting a thin, flexible tube called a catheter into the varicose vein. The tip of the catheter heats the walls of the vein and destroys the vein tissue. Once destroyed, the vein is no longer able to carry blood and is absorbed by the body.

Sclerotherapy
This is the most common way to treat both spider and varicose veins. A saline or chemical solution is injected into the veins. This causes them to harden, so they no longer fill with blood. Blood that normally returns to the heart through these veins will now return through other veins. The veins that received the injection eventually shrivel and disappear, and the scar tissue is absorbed by the body.

Coming Soon!
Robotic surgery or robotic-assisted surgery
: Similar to standard laparoscopic surgery, this newer technique allows a surgeon to control a robot that moves the surgical instruments.

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Minimally Invasive Procedures can help these diseases:

  • Varicose Veins (Venous Disease)

  • Vascular Disease (Peripheral Artery Disease)

  • Spinal Pain/Pain Management (Kyphoplasty)

  • Benign Prostatic Hypertrophy (BPH)

  • Diabetes Care/Management

  • Abdominal Aortic Aneurysm (AAA)

  • Cancer Management

  • Uterine Fibroid

MIMIT Health provides world class health care combined with minimally invasive treatments by industry-leading physicians and surgeons. Along with our best-in-class health care, we focus on our patients "living their best life" with healthy lifestyle strategies and wellness solutions.

If you have any questions about minimally invasive surgeries or would like to refer a patient, MIMIT Health can be reached 24 hours a day, 7 days a week, at (708) 486-2600 or email info@mimithealth.com 

Less is More with Minimally Invasive Treatments at MIMIT Health

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More and more patients are requesting minimally invasive treatments as an option to surgery. MIMIT Health offers an environment where doctors are constantly encouraged to grow, learn and refine their skills with minimally invasive procedures. Because of this nurturing atmosphere, our physicians are leaders in their field, involved in pioneering new techniques, working with companies to refine instrumentation and technology, conducting research, and training other surgeons from around the nation and world.

Minimally invasive procedures are a great alternative to open surgery. Here are some of the many advantages of minimally invasive surgery:

  • A few small cuts versus a large incision

  • Less trauma to the muscles, nerves and tissues

  • Less bleeding

  • Less scarring

  • Less trauma to organs

  • Less pain and reduced use of narcotics

  • Less hospital time

  • Less effect on the immune system

MIMIT Health provides minimally invasive treatments performed by industry-leading physicians led by the renowned Dr Romi Chopra. Integrated with our best-in-class health care, we focus on patients "living their best life”
 
We call this enlightened health care.

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Here are some of our services:

  • Varicose Veins (Venous Disease)

  • Vascular Disease (Peripheral Artery Disease)

  • Spinal Pain/Pain Management (Kyphoplasty)

  • Benign Prostatic Hypertrophy (BPH)

  • Diabetes Care/Management

  • Abdominal Aortic Aneurysm (AAA)

  • Cancer Management

  • Uterine Fibroids

If you have any questions or would like to refer a patient, MIMIT Health can be reached 24 hours a day, 7 days a week, at (708) 486-2600 or email info@mimithealth.com.
 
We’re Hiring!
MIMIT Health is looking for dedicated and caring medical professionals including Medical Assistants, Operating Room (OR) Technicians, Physician Liaisons and more. If you are interested, or know someone interested in working for MIMIT Health, please send a short cover letter and your resume to info@mimithealth.com. Also check out our Career page.

MIMIT Health's Dr. Paramjit “Romi” Chopra Talks With YourTango, A Leading Online Magazine, About Diabetes

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6 Subtle Signs Of Diabetes You Might Miss . . .

Don't ignore what your body is saying.

We'd expect some hints that we have diabetes, but that's not always the case. Most adults diagnosed have no diabetes symptoms whatsoever, and in those who do have symptoms, they are often very subtle and can be easily missed.

“The most common symptoms are frequent urination (peeing constantly), excessive thirst (because you are peeing constantly), and blurry vision (due to fluid buildup in the eyes),” says Dr. Cara Pensabene of EHE Health.  "Other signs of diabetes include numbness or tingling in your hands and feet, unintentional weight loss, increased fatigue, skin darkening (in areas like the back of the neck, under the armpits, or in the groin), and frequent (vaginal) yeast infections in women." 

Be sure to look out for the following signs of diabetes, as some can be extremely serious and lead to further complications.

1. Fatigue

Fatigue is different than just being tired, which can often be relieved through rest. Even after resting, someone with fatigue still feel exhaustion and lethargic.

Why? According to Dr. Romi Chopra, an interventional radiologist and founder of MIMIT Health, “This happens in those with diabetes as a result of being overweight, change in blood sugar levels, or from mental and emotional issues associated with not being diagnosed with diabetes and wondering what is going on.”

2. Thirst

Thirst and/or increased urination is due to the production of excess sugar, which builds up in the blood.

“This build-up causes the kidneys to work overtime to try and absorb or filter excess sugar. When it is not absorbed, it is discharged in the urine, which depletes the body of fluids, causing the increased urination. Due to increased urination and loss of fluids, the body becomes dehydrated and thirsty,” Dr. Chopra warns.

3. Hunger and/or weight loss

Dr. Chopra says, “Weight loss and increased hunger also come as a side effect of increased urination because it is a loss of calories. Simultaneously, diabetes is keeping sugar from the cells, which is the cause for the increased hunger.”

4. Vision issues

Blurry vision is often a symptom of diabetes that goes unnoticed. But what causes it?

According to Dr. Chopra, “It is caused by the build-up of sugar in the blood pulling fluids from the body, including the lens of the eyes. If this is left untreated, new blood vessels may develop behind the eye, damaging the existing vessels, which can eventually lead to vision loss.”

5. Horizontal ridges on fingernails

“While these are not always a cause for concern as they may only be a symptom of acute trauma, horizontal ridges on the fingernails may indicate a more serious illness like pneumonia or diabetes,” warns Caleb Backe, Certified Personal Trainer for Maple Holistics.

6. Fruity breath

If your breath smells sweet in the morning, this could be another sign of a bigger issue that you shouldn’t ignore. “Fruity breath could indicate pre-diabetes symptoms that result from inflammatory issues,” says Backe.

7. Tingling, burning, or foot numbness

This may have happened because you wore a pair of ill-fitting shoes, but it could also mean you have prediabetes, and it’s a sign of elevated blood sugar levels.

“The illness causes damage to the circulatory and nervous systems. Prediabetes usually has no symptoms, so full-blown diabetes is usually unpreventable. If your feet feel weird for more than a few weeks, you should make an appointment,” Backe advises.

If you have any questions or would like to set up an appointment, MIMIT Health can be reached 24 hours a day, 7 days a week, at (708) 486-2600 or email info@mimithealth.com.



MIMIT Health | We are Peripheral Artery Disease (PAD) Specialists

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Talking with a health care professional about peripheral artery disease (PAD) is important, but you might not be sure how to do it. You want to ask questions that will get you the information you need to make the best decisions about your health. Or maybe you’ve already been diagnosed with PAD, but you still have questions or concerns about your health or treatment plan.

For example, your doctor may recommend lifestyle changes or minimally invasive medical procedures. Or your doctor could suggest amputation, a common treatment for advanced stages of PAD. Treatment options are constantly advancing, and today’s techniques to treat PAD are very different than they were just five years ago. If you think you may be at risk for PAD, click here for a list of questions you can use to help guide your talk with your doctor about the risk factors for this disease.

If you have been diagnosed with PAD and you’ve been told you need an amputation due to PAD or CLI (critical limb ischemia) or that you are at risk for an amputation, these questions can help to guide a conversation with your doctor:

  • Are there tests I should have that can provide more information about my condition?

  • Does your clinic/hospital have a limb salvage program?

  • What treatment options do I have other than amputation?

  • What benefits do these options offer compared to amputation?

  • What are potential complications associated with these alternatives?

  • What type of post-treatment recovery should I expect?

  • What type of training and experience do you have with these options?

You can learn about the disease by reading this website. But don’t wait – early detection and treatment are important – talk to a health care professional about PAD now.

Not all health care professionals are PAD specialists – and not all PAD specialists use the most current treatment techniques – so it is important to get a second opinion that could help guide your treatment decisions. If your doctor or hospital does not have a limb salvage program, you might want to consider consulting a PAD specialist

If you have any questions about PAD or would like to set up an appointment, MIMIT Health can be reached 24 hours a day, 7 days a week, at (708) 486-2600 or email info@mimithealth.com.